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MSNBC
Nov 13, 2012 5:30am EST
>> late last night the fbi drops by the home of paula broadwell, the woma involved in the alleged affair with cia director david petraeus with agents carrying out boxes of material. now the top military commander in afghanistan is being investigated by the pentagon for having inappropriate communications with jill kelley, the woman who first blew the whistle on broadwell's threatening e-mails. oh, boy, here we go. good morning. i'm mika brzezinski, along with joe scarborough, this is "way too early," the show that receives on average about a dozen inappropriate communications from donny deutsch every day. >> every half hour. it's a long story. by the way, shirtless as well. we will talk about that. >> that's on a good day. thanks for being up with us. shoot us an e-mail or tweet u us and let us know why you're awake right now. or do what jill kelley's twin sister does and text the word awake followed by your response to 622639. we'll read the best responses later in the show. >> you kids make sure if your dad sends an e-mail, the shirt stays on. okay? seriously. i'm tired of looki
CNN
Nov 13, 2012 4:00am PST
inadvertently exposed the affair between general petraeus and paula broadwell. meantime a team of fbi agents searched broadwell's home in charlotte, north carolina, overnight, and spent nearly five hours there wrapping up just after 1:00 in the morning. "wall street journal" is reporting that the fbi agent who launched the petraeus investigation himself is under investigation. in part because he sent shirtless pictures of himself to jill kelley. jill kelley, the woman who kicked off all of this investigation, by complaining about the e-mails that she was getting from the petraeus mistress. so the agent, who knew kelley, allegedly sent those pictures before any investigation began, but as you can see, the story is getting much more complicated. we've got team coverage of the breaking news this morning. chris lawrence is at the pentagon. chris, i don't even know where to begin because there's so much to talk about. let's start with general allen. what's the implications of this -- of him being brought in to petraeus scandal and what has he said about it? >> so far, from what we've heard from d
CNN
Nov 13, 2012 2:00am PST
with the case. >> and there's more. a team of fbi agents searching paula broadwell's home yesterday. eight to ten agents brought cardboard boxes and searched both levels of the house. the fbi confirmed agents were there but wouldn't say what they were looking for. >> obviously, a lot going on here. we have two reports. chris lawrence of the pentagon and brianna keeler in our washington bureau. let's start with chris. chris, we're talking about two high-level government officials in a scandal, general allen sent to become the supreme ally commander for nato. first off, what's the latest on the investigation? you are hearing anything? what is going to happen to general allen? >> reporter: yeah, right now what i'm hearing is that general allen is here in washington wondering exactly the same thing. he was just 48 hours away from going before that senate confirmation hearing to take over nato. now that has been postponed. he is here and people are wondering what's going to happen to him next. from what we've been able to determine from sources at the pentagon, basically they are looking
CNN
Nov 13, 2012 5:00am EST
, paula broadwell. >> get this. "the wall street journal" reports the fbi agent who launched the petraeus investigation was removed from the case after it was discovered he sent a shirtless picture of himself to jill kelly. the agent who knew kelly sent the pictures before the investigation began. he was later removed from the investigation because supervisors were concerned the agent may have become obsessed with the case. >> and there's more. a team of fbi agents searching paula broadwell's home yesterday. eight to ten agents brought cardboard boxes and searched both levels of the house. the fbi confirmed agents were there but wouldn't say what they were looking for. >> obviously, a lot going on here. we have two reports. chris lawrence of the pentagon and brianna keeler in our washington bureau. let's start with chris. chris, we're talking about two high-level government officials in a scandal, general allen sent to become the supreme ally commander for nato. first off, what's the latest on the investigation? you are hearing anything? what is going to happen to general allen? >> report
MSNBC
Nov 13, 2012 2:30am PST
harassing e-mails that the fbi linked back to paula broadwell, that agent grew concerned that the investigation had stalled and contacted a member of congress, even though the white house was still unaware of the case. chair of the senate intelligence committee, senator dianne feinstein, says she is growing more concerned as the story unfolds. >> generally, what we call the four corners, the chair and rankings of both committees are briefed on operationally sensitive matters. this is certainly an operationally sensitive matter, but we weren't briefed. i don't know who made that decision. and i think, you know, that makes it much more difficult. this thing came so fast and hard and since then it's been like peeling an onion, another day another peel comes off and you see a whole new dimension to this. my concern has actually escalated over the last few days. >> meanwhile, the fbi is defending its handling of the petraeus investigation. nbc news chief justice correspondent pete williams has that part of the story. >> reporter: law enforcement officials say the fbi began by tracing w
FOX News
Nov 13, 2012 12:00pm PST
and paula broadwell has hired an attorney. and her father told the newspaper that this is about something else entirely and the truth will come out. there is a lot more that going to come out. you wait-and-see. there is a lot more than meets the eye. she went running this morning but has not spoken to the press. >>shepard: we have learned that both of the generals bought involved with a custody dispute with jill kelly's sister. what is that about. >>reporter: what we have learned is that both generals wrote letters on behalf of natalie, the twin sister jill kelley involved in a bitter custody battle for her four year old son and the letters were written in september as part of the custody battle. i will read from them, one from general petraeus, or from david petraeus at c.i.a., "when we hosted them and her family for christmas dinner this past year, in each case, we have seen a very loving relationship. a mother working hard to provide her son enjoyable educational and development experiences, in view of this it is unfortunate in my view that her interaction with her son has be
CBS
Nov 13, 2012 1:35am PST
baby you're all baby you're all i've ever needed you're all i've ever needed i love you more than i knew i could ever love someone baby you're all baby you're all baby you're all i've ever needed ♪ [cheers and applause] craig: that was sensational. great. you were fantastic. it's fantastic. nikki reed paul mcdonald. good night, everybody. good night. ,,,,,,,,,,nt. the port has been investigating him along with the director since last month. receipts from a business trip show both spent more than $4,500 in public money entertaining shipping executives at a strip club. he remains on administrative leave as the investigation continues and the acting director will fill his shoes. he will not receive severance as part of his retirement package. they are continuing the investigation and will talk about policies and any changes to the policies at its meeting on thursday. live in oakland, cbs 5. >>> we learned new information in the sex scandal that forced cia director david petraeus to resign. >> it is getting very complimented. the fbi is investigating general john allen. he is the successor. the feds found 20 in the pages of potentially inappropriate e- mails -- 20,000 pages of potential inappropriate e-mails between him and jill kelley. like i said it is getting more complicated. cbs reporter elizabeth cook sorts it out. >> day of revelations. -letters start with the -- let's start with the woman who cia director david petraeus was having an affair. the fbi removed evidence from her home. agents have been looking at e- mails at he sent to jill kelley. those e-mails don't look like a threat to national security they seem to be snarky messages with a jealous message. >> reporter: jill kelley has done fundraising for the military. paula broadwell saw her as a romantic rival. paula broadwell sent jill kelley anonymous e-mails from a secret account that her and david petraeus shared. when the fbi started poking around, agents thought someone breached david petraeus' private e-mail account but it turned out they stumbled on a secret communication system they used to communicate. some of the messages sexually explicit. david petraeus would write an e- mail, he wouldn't send it, saved it to his draft folder. paula broadwell would log on and read the e-mail, that way there was never any record of messages being sent. mean time tonight much is being made of this interview paula broadwell gave a few months ago. >> i don't know if you heard this -- >> reporter: she is talking about information surrounding the terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> had taken them prisoner and they think it was an effort to get the prisoners back. >> reporter: fbi found classified information on paula broadwell's computer. >> i do not know how she got that information, i don't know why. it is a confused situation. >>> there is another twist to the story. the fbi agent who launched the investigation was taken off the case for sending shirtless photos to who else, jill kelley. friends tell us david petraeus is spending time with his family and his wife is furious. elizabeth cook, cbs 5. >>> police in belize want to talk to john mcafee. the john mcafee who started the anti-computer virus company. this is a picture of john mcafee in 2008 and this is a more recent picture. cbs reporter kid dough. >> the john mcafee that everybody thought they knew is gone. what is left is the guns and the madness. >> smart guy. accomplished guy. he is a guy that has some dark demons. >> reporter: he took this photo a few months ago. he said john mcafee was showing psychopath behavior. >> it allowed him to do whatever he wants. the things he wants to do has sometimes been very destructive. >> reporter: on sunday a housekeeper found the body of a neighborhood shot in the back of the head. john mcafee is a person of interest but since disappeared. tonight he has been calling a reporter who tweeted, john mcafee just called now, i will do whatever it takes to stay alive. >> he is innocent till proven guilty. john mcafee has frightened his neighbors. >> reporter: john mcafee moved to belize in 2008 with $100 million from the sale of his company. the police later raided his home and seized these guns. john mcafee gave a interview to the local newspaper in may. >> i would never expect 42 armed soldiers and police to storm into his property. >> claims he put a box over his head to evade police. >> is he capable of killing somebody? i wouldn't but limits on what john mcafee is capable of. >> reporter: on going and evolleyballing trag -- evolving pagied. >>> police shot a u.s. machine from san jose this morning. he refused to stop for officers on bike patrol around 2:00 a.m. the marine then hit one of the officers with his car in a parking garage, prompting police to open fire. another marine with him was arrested for public intoxication. >>> murder charges have been dropped against a man even though he confessed to killing a man. the judge said police didn't read him his rights, had to let him go. in this case the police didn't think they had to. >> reporter: it was with great fanfare police announced an arrest in a murder cases in 2010. he was gunned down as he was getting out of his car at the shopping mall. in front of family and members of his commuter, police announced his killer was his childhood front. now the judge said police never read him his rights. >> the real question was when he was talking about wanting an attorney, whether or not the questioning should have stopped and the judge said it should have. it is something we don't agree with. >> reporter: is it possible police made a critical error here? >> i think the police acted properly. >> reporter: he stunned police when he said he had information about the murder. >> he was the one who did it. he murdered him in cold blood. >> the district attorney said he was not under arrest when he talked and there was no obligation to read him his rights. >> he said that all the way through, i want to keen talking to -- keep talking to you. and as the questioning proceeded it became apparent he had more than just information, he had information that only the killer could have had. >> the district attorney insists the case is not over. >> we believe we have the right person and we are going a do everything we can. >> the district attorney says he has three options, appeal the ruling, refile the charges or throw out the case and he won't be doing that. we will make a decision tomorrow. cbs 5. >>> developing news out of marine county, a man's truck plunged into the rev war around -- reservoir around 6:00 p.m. witnesses said the truck was weaving before it went into the water. that truck was under 15 feet of water with its lights visible. >> drifted off the road, hit the guard rail. the vehicle rolled off and into the water. >> emergency workers pulled the victim, a man, 65-70 years old from the truck. >>> there is a wake up call, be wear of yawning behind the wheel. the chp will crack down on sleephy drivers. -- sleepy drivers. >> not paying attention, not good. >> reporter: if you have driven, it is bound to happen, you start dozing off. >> worse. you feel the rumble strip and you just scare yourself over and over again. >> reporter: with holiday road trips coming up, the chp is warning about the dangers of being sleepily behind the wheel. >> weaving outside of your lane, breaking. >> reporter: the chp says drowsy diving caused 3600 collisions, 32 deaths and 2,000 injuries in 2010. if you are getting sleepy it is not just about downing caffeine. >> get out of your car. walk around. >> reporter: if you get pulled over, you could get a ticket for a moving violation. cbs 5. >>> it goes with me in the bath, shower. >> afraid of going without your cell phone? the new condition doctors are taking seriously. >> a very large percentage of runners get injured. >> running wrong and getting hurt, the secret technique to running right. what it has to do withation introducing smooth sensations cream cheese spread from the laughing cow. it's rich, indulgent and 45 calories. mmm it's so good -- it practically sells itself. cut, cut. sells itself? i've poured myself into this commercial. ♪ don't be boring ♪ indulge in the morning ya! 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[ female announcer ] introducing smooth sensations cream cheese spread from the laughing cow. increased risk of having a d with autism. researchers looked at almost . >>> pregnant women who get the flu may be a increase risk of having a child with autism. kids had twice the risk of autism if their mom had the flu while pregnant. having a fever was associated with tripthal risk. >> we know -- triple the risk. >> they are more sensitive to complications. >> the risk is low. 99% of moms who had the flu or fever during pregnancy did not have a child with autism but doctors say it is a reason for a flu shot. >>> the iphone 5 just hit the market but there is already talk they are working on a new version. it will enter trial protection next month. >>> if you get separation anxiety when your cell phone isn't close by, you are not alone. she takes her phone into the shower with her. the new condition and the symptoms. >> while i am sleeping my hand is on my phone. >> reporter: more than a fixation. or a simple cell phone obsession. >> some people report panic just at the thought of not having their phone. >> reporter: no mobile phone phobia, the fear of going without your cell phone. she is a wife, mother of two, attorney. >> as a mom there are so many things i can do with my cell phone. order my school lunches. look at cameras that are inside my house through apps and check on my children. >> reporter: a tech junky. who is working through it. working with a doctor, some of the symptoms including -- >> using it in inappropriate places. checking the battery life. >> reporter: although it is most common in women 18-24, it is not just a sign of the times. >> somebody may have thoughts of i can't do my day without my phone. i have to get my phone. >> reporter: she cautions deis not a dis-- it is not a disorder they treat. she feels expected to be reachable 24/7, it was a sign of anxiety she needed to manage. >> the panic and anxiety i feel is probably not normal. >> dave: she teaches patients distraction techniques to ease their anxiety. playing with sand or making small talk. >>> running is one of the most popular ways to stay in shape but most of us are doing it wrong and getting hurt. how should we be running? cbs reporter dr. kim says think eggs. >> reporter: we run for all reasons and in all sorts of ways. but could it be we are running wrong? >> says who? >> reporter: says our aching knees, hips, legs and back. >> a large percentage of runners get injured. >> reporter: as many as 90 runners training for a marathon. the researchers come up with a tratagy to cut the risk. the -- strategy to cut the risk. take lighter, quicker steps. in other words, your right foot should hit the time 80-90 time as minute. >> that decreases the stride length and reduces the impact forces that are generated. >> reporter: using tiny markers, scientists quantify how a runner moves. these two skeletons tell the story. a runner with a long stride who takes fewer steps. >> it is far extended. >> reporter: on the bottom a runner taking more steps but beginning directly under the body. >> not reaching as much. >> the difference, the runner with the long stride creates an impact peak linked to injury. while not everybody needs to boost the number of steps they take -- >> running with better technique will be safer for people. >> reporter: he takes more steps. >> feels awkward at first. >> reporter: now he has it down. his goal -- >> to beat my wife in december. to finish and finish strong. >> reporter: without injury. cbs 5. >>> victoria's secret is used to turning heads but what one model wore is not the attention victoria's secret wants. they had them wear a native american headdress. groups said it was disrespectful so victoria's secret will edit that scene out of their fashion show that airs next month here on cbs 5. >>> dry tonight but big weather changes that involve as lot ,,,, paul wrap both bears quarterback jay . >>> weather time. it is getting darker earlier but we get beautiful shots like this. city of san francisco. clear tonight. and san francisco is one of the milder spots. here are your temperatures. livermore 43. san francisco 54. san jose 50. it will be milder tonight because of high thin clouds working its way in from the north. concord 43. oakland 49. redwood city 46. warmer than the past couple nights. we will be frost free. high pressure in control for the next couple days. we are on the northern fringe of this. clouds the next few days. partly cloudy skies as the edge of that high is over the top of the bay area. big weather change coming on friday. low pressure digs in off shore. this will hang out for a few days. once it moves through sunday and monday it will get soggy in here. not just showers here and there, it will be a widespread soaking rainfall, especially sunday and monday. dry tuesday, wednesday, thursday. three dry days. change on friday, showers. weekend looks wet, especially sunday and monday, soggy. upper 60s tomorrow for oakland and concord. san jose 70. redwood city 68. napa 66 degrees. here is your extended forecast, wednesday and thursday, pleasant. dry. here comes the showers on friday. the weekend looks soggy and ,,,, cutler and the 49ers alex sh suffered concussions yester. unless "both" pass a seriesf >>> both bears quarterback and the 49ers suffered concussions yesterday. unless both past a series of test you could be looking at campbell versus kaepernick. in the 2nd quarter with st. louis, smith finishes the drive with blurred vision. blowing a touchdown but he did not return to the game after that drive and today jim harbaugh said he won't know status till later this week. monday night football. wind, rain and cold. chief led early but pittsburgh comes back. look that catch. wallace makes the catch to tie the game 10-10. ben roethlisberger gets sacked. he leaves the game. goes to the hospital for an mri. over time. tied 13-13. chip shot. 23-yarder. 55 seconds in over time. we get a winner there, steelers 16-13. bryce harper won the national league rookie of the year, the second youngest player in the nl. look at this guy. did it all year long. mike trout was the choice in the american league. yoenis cespedes finishing second place. trout will get the mvp. did jim harbaugh suffer any effects from his concussion days? it is a top 5? >> no. people may have a different opinion on that. [ laughter ] >> you think? cowboys defensive coordinator play sheet. this is called product placement. about to get fined. number three, oregon and oregon state, women's soccer. scoring a goal with her face. that is a first. clint bowyer and jeff gordon wreck, leading to a fight. brad keselowski was not happy. >> [ bleep ]. that is [ bleep ]. that is all you can call that. they just tried to kill each other. i get called for [ bleep ] racing hard and i see stuff ,,,,
CNN
Nov 12, 2012 11:00pm EST
days before he was to receive about benghazi add up. >>> plus, who is paula broadwell, the woman at the center of the scandal. how she became so close with petraeus, along with the warning signs that something may have been wrong. and an "outfront" investigation into complaints the red cross is not doing enough to help victims of sandy. are donations getting to the people who need them? let's go "outfront." good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, a risky affair. there are new questions about the affair that led cia director david petraeus to resign and when did he pose a national security threat. the affair came to light during an investigation of so-called jealous e-mails sent by paula broadwell to this woman in tampa. her name is jill kelley. tonight a u.s. official confirms to cnn that petraeus told broadwell to stop sending harassing e-mails to kelley. who is kelley? along with her husband, she's known petraeus and his family for more than five years. that couple met the four star general when he was stationed at medil air force base in tampa. now, what abo
CNN
Nov 13, 2012 2:00am EST
god bless you, god bless our veterans. >> wonderful! >> that's it for us, thanks for watching. erin burnett outfront starts right now. stumbles on his affair. does the timing of his resignation just days before he was to receive about benghazi add up. >>> plus, who is paula broadwell, the woman at the center of the scandal. how she became so close with petraeus, along with the warning signs that something may have been wrong. and an "outfront" investigation into complaints the red cross is not doing enough to help victims of sandy. are donations getting to the people who need them? let's go "outfront." good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, a risky affair. there are new questions about the affair that led cia director david petraeus to resign and when did he pose a national security threat. the affair came to light during an investigation of so-called jealous e-mails sent by paula broadwell to this woman in tampa. her name is jill kelley. tonight a u.s. official confirms to cnn that petraeus told broadwell to stop sending harassing e-mails to kelley. who is kelley? along with her husband, she's known petraeus and his family for more than five years. that couple met the four star general when he was stationed at medil air force base in tampa. now, what about the e-mails? what's in them? here's what we can tell you tonight. a description of the e-mails seems to validate what a friend of petraeus tells us, that petraeus felt broadwell had shown a possessiveness toward him. as to whether she gained any information during her relationship to petraeus, here's something we found. here's what we found, a speech she gave in october of 006, while she was under investigation for those harassing e-mails that seems to add fuel to the fire. >> the cia an ex-had actually taken a couple libyan militia members prisoner, and they think the attack on the consulate was an attempt to get these prisoners back. that's still being vetted. >> still being vetted. and knowing about those prisoners being there in the first place, wasn't something you heard about on the news. how did she know? suzanne kelly is our intelligence correspondent and i know you've been reporting on this throughout the day. what are the concerns that broadwell had or has classified information? >> something like you just showed is a perfect example of the problem. you don't really know what her source is on something like that and what she said about the cia holding prisoners in benghazi and that prompted the attack there that led to the death of ambassador stevens, that's really a bombshell revelation right there. you have to wonder,she getting that information directly from petraeus or is it coming from somewhere else? that's the real nature of the problem is trying to figure out where information was coming from and that was one of the things that the fbi focused on early on in their information. did she have classified information that she shun the have had? and was it inappropriate? they ultimately found she did not have information that would have warranted any legal action. >> and when paula -- you know her and you spoke with her, she told you she was writing another book about david petraeus. and what she was known for is the one book she wrote, and co authored by david petraeus. what did you think when you spoke to her? >> well, we spoke at the security forum on the summer and she's very open about talking about her relationship with general petraeus in terms of the access that she had. the first book she had written and she was very much looking forward to writing a second book, which would be a larger story about general petraeus' legacy. and we know from people who have worked closely with him in the past, that his legacy was something very important to him. >> and what do you know do you know about david petraeus' relationship with jill kelley, the other woman here, the woman, who in a sense, i guess, started all of this, because of what had been called harassing e-mails sent by paula broadwell to jill kelley. >> a really interesting twist. the nature of that relationship appears to be a family friend. a government source says that kelley has been known to be on the washington social circuit. it's possible they had socialized here, but source say friends are describing her as feeling like she's an innocent victim in this and that a friend of petraeus' who spoke with him throughout the weekend and also today, erin, says that the general, the retired general has assisted to his friends that he only had one affair. only one other woman. >> the big question tonight, who knew what, and when did they know it about the petraeus affair? and does the timing of his resignation add up? here's what we can tell you tonight, in the early summer the fbi began an investigation. by the late summer, high level officials at the fbi and the justice department were notified. that investigators uncovered what appeared to be an affair between petraeus and broadwell. now, according to the "wall street journal," eric holder is among those who were informed. now, between october 21st and november 3rd, the fbi agented interviewed broadwell and petraeus. then on october 31st, eric cantor's office was notified. he passed on the concerns to robert mueller. now, on november 2nd, the fbi said there's tho evidence petraeus committed a crime and they rule out charges, then it is election day when james clapper is first informed of the investigation. at 5:00 p.m. he called petraeus and advised him to resign. it wasn't until after the election the president was notified that the chief of the country's spy agency was under investigation and had been since the beginning of the summer. on friday, the president accepted petraeus' resignation. house and senate leaders were informed at that time. bob barrows also joins us and bob, let me ask you about this fbi investigation. it began in the early summer. the president was only informed after the election. his director of national intelligence informed at 5:00 on election day. congressional leaders were informed even after the resignation. defense secretary leon panetta was asked today whether capitol hill should have been notified sooner and said, i want to quote, that's another issue we ought to look at because as former director of the cia and having worked closely with the intelligence committees, you know, i believe there is a responsibility to make sure they're informed. did they handle this correctly? >> no. somebody dropped the ball. you never blind side the president. when a senior official in his administration under investigation when e-mails are being read, you inform the white house at a very high level. national security adviser. his council. even the president himself. you always do that. it's a standing protocol inside the federal government. never blindside the president. as far as i've seen, this president was blindsided. >> do you think part of it had to do with the fact it was petraeus who was involved given the, his reputation and how many people looked up to him, admired him, the cult of petraeus as it's been called? >> it was that, but the fbi hates these sort of things. they don't like to look into affairs. they like to deal in crimes that they can define and in this case, there wasn't a crime. suzanne was absolutely right. when they first saw this, they said, oh, my, stuff is getting leaked out. this woman is out there talking, quoting petraeus in denver, saying if you look at the rest of the transcript, it says david petraeus can't go to the press, but -- so they were probably very worried, so they went ahead with with it, but did not inform the white house as it's been reported, which is a huge mistake. >> suzanne, it sounds like when we're talking about what happened in denver, when paula broadwell was referring to libyans being held in libya for the benghazi attacks, it's possible, right, that she may have had classified information still, we don't know? >> right, i should also note to you that an intelligence official told us today, just adamant about that being false information. it would be a really big deal because the cia is not really allowed to detain people people. they lost that privilege in 2009, so to say that the cia is holding three people prisoner is huge. it's not like you're just going out there and saying the general likes to run every day. i mean, these are really potentially explosive things. >> bob, what about -- go ahead. >> i'd like to add, we have to parse this. the cia, yes, it does not hold prisoners. but that compound in benghazi was more than the cia. there were several contracting groups. the pentagon. there was a military unit in the area at the time. it was not delta forces as reported. but there was a military unit. i've been assured they did not hold prisoners. maybe the libyans picked him up and accuses people at the consulate of taking -- we just don't have the details. >> are we not going to get answers on the invest because of this? some want him to, but -- >> you know, why would the cia have a fire base in benghazi, libya? why was it not better protected? why did we not know that whole base was ringed by al-qaeda related militias and why did this investigation start in the first place because a harassment complaint to the fbi just never goes any way unless it's comarried with another piece of information and we don't have what that other piece of information is, because it's sensitive. and that's why we're asking so many questions. >> and we're going to keep asking them until we get answers and bob, thank you very much for taking the time and suzanne as well. >>> still to come, more on the scandal. just who is paula broadwell. that goes to the heart of the question, what she knew and how it matters. and how did she get so close to the director of the cia? plus, an "outfront" investigation into the red cross response to sandy. are the millions of dollars donated to the charity, the ones every time you see online, you sydow nature to the red cross? are they getting to victims of the storm? and how will the president and congress avoid the fiscal cliff? erskine bowles comes outfront swinging next. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. 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[ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. energy is being produced to power our lives. while energy development comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> our second story outfront, 50 days until we fall off the fiscal cliff, unless washington acts. both parties claim to be optimistic about a deal to avert the end of the year combination of an end of the year increase in tax rates and slash in spending. how exactly, now, we know there are a lot of meetings scheduled. tomorrow, with the labor community. wednesday, the business community and friday, there's a meeting with harry reid, mitch mcconnell, house speaker john boehner and minority leader nancy pelosi. so, will we get a deal? one man getting a lot of attention is erskine bowles. who along with alan simpson created the simpson-bowles plan on deficit reduction. i have to start by asking you, did you ever think your name would be part of pop culture? you are the bowles in simpson bowles. >> better be simpson bowles than bowles simpson since everybody knows him by his initials here in washington. >> so, when you talk about things, sacred cows, untouchables, whatever the word might be, in your proposal, the one paul ryan decided not to back, the one barack obama decided not to back, you had an increase in the federal gasoline tax. caps on mortgage interest. charitable donations and retirement contributions. these were all tough choices you made. you also increased the eligibility age for medicare and social security. reduced benefits for wealthier seniors. some of those things i've heard democrats and republicans say they agree on, others they loathe them. is there anything that should be untouchable? >> the problems are real, no easy way out. we've got to come up with at least $4 trillion of deficit reduction and that's not the maximum amount we need to do is not even the ideal amount. it's the minimum amount we need to reduce the deficit in order to stabilize the debt and get it on the path to stabilizing the gdp. >> it's interesting you say it that way. it's not the maximum, barely the minimum. bill gross from pimco says 16 trillion, which is not to be negative, but just to say people who think your plan is tough, it's getting us started on this path. it's not solving everything. >> absolutely. he's 100% right. i'd be a lot happier with 5 or 6 trillion because i think that's what we need in order to solve this problem long-term. >> why do you think we can get this done now when for ten years, it's been failure. >> erin, i think this is truly the magic moment. we've got a second term democratic president who is willing to put entitlements on the table. we've got a republican speaker who really gets it, who understands the dangers we face and is willing to put revenue on the table. we've probably got as many as 50 members in the senate, equal number republicans and democrats who are for a ballots plan, but most importantly, what we have, we have this fiscal cliff, this crisis, which will really create chaos if we go the fiscal cliff and don't get a deal there after. i'm really worried about that. >> that brings me to something paul krugman wrote. the title is let's not make a deal. what the comment was, nothing very bad will happen to the economy if an agreement isn't reached until a few weeks or months into 2013. so there's time to bargain. the stalemate would hurt republican backers every much as it hurt the rest of the country. as the risk of severe damage grew, republicans would face intense pressure to cut a deal after all. a few months into next year? >> i think that's crazy. you know, why would you bet the country, really put bet the country but going over this fiscal cliff? if we go over this cliff, you'll see another 2 million people lose their jobs. you'll see the unemployment rate go up to, let's say, 9%, and you'll see the rate of growth slowed anywhere from 3 to 4%, which is enough to put us back into recession. we could go over the cliff and immediately get a deal, that would be okay. but if we go over the cliff and don't get a deal right away, i think you're going to create an enormous problem. >> now, on revenue, i know as part of plan, you assume bush tax rates would go up, loopholes would close, but is there room for compromise around how we define revenue? that if you were to close a lot of loopholes affecting the wealthy, but not increase the tax rates, would that be a deal you think could be struck or no? >> yes. i think it should be. what we should be concerned about is revenue and making sure revenue comes from the right sources. from people at the upper ends of the tax bracket and i think you can do that, even by raising rates or by broadening the base and simplifying the code and wiping oxford university these expenditures, particularly those that go to upper income individuals. >> and a final question to you, sir, tim geithner is leaving as treasury secretary at the end of the year. your name has been floated ferociously and furiously. would you like that job? >> if they'll move the treasury to charlotte i would, otherwise, i think i'm going to stay at home. >> that's the thing, you would have to move your domicile? >> i'd have to leave charlotte and i don't want to leave charlotte. i've been married 42 years. lived in the same town as my wife for 22. i think it's time for me to stay home for a while. >> all right, well thank you very much. we appreciate it. >> thank you so much. good to talk to you. >> a man not afraid to mince words and say what he thinks. we need people like that. >>> "outfront" next, the red cross receiving millions of dollars to help the victims of sandy. but is the relief getting to those who desperately need it? >>> plus, how those around petraeus suspected something more than was going on. the warning signs coming up. about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. 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[ forsythe ] if i wouldn't put it on my table at home, i wouldn't bring it in. my name's jon forsythe, and i sea food differently. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ >>> our third story "outfront" the red cross under attack. america's largest private relief organization is facing growing criticism in response to sandy 237 despite raising more than $100 million for the victims, many across the northeast are still reeling and asking why. we asked susan candiotti to take a look and follow the millions in destinations pouring in for sandy relief. >> reporter: as the storm cleanup began, the man in charge of the besieged borough of staten island said he'd had enough with the american red cross. >> all these people making these big salaries should be out there on the front lines. i am disappointed. my advice to the people of staten island, do not go to the red cross. >> his outrage lasted only one day. he backed off his criticism soon, telling cnn that all was just fine. >> it was killing me. i spoke out. i got angry. >> but his outburst it turns out wasn't the only assault on the red cross. a private charity that's considered the gold standard in american disaster relief. some old questions are being asked again, about what happens to all the money donated to the red cross by generous americans. >> at the end of the day, there is little oversight in this whole system. >> reporter: ben heads a watchdog group called the disaster accountability project. red cross salaries are very high, and their tax filings prove it. its ceo receives over $500,000 annually. and its top 11 executives get pay packages that begin at $275,000 a year. >> you've got an organization that's in fund-raising mode. they're run by their p.r. operation right now. they're putting on their best face, they don't want to invite scrutiny. >> teaming up with the american red cross. >> all those telethons on abc and nbc have helped raise nearly 120 million in donations for sandy relief. and corporate commitments already pledged will elevate that total to nearly a quarter of a billion dollars. money the red cross says will be spent on the ground. >> we understand that people get frustrated, we understand the criticisms. we know where they're coming from, but by and large what most people say to us is thank you. >> charity ratings organizations give the red cross high marks. on the ground, it's all about visibility. right here in the disaster zone, there are questions as well about the red cross and it effectiveness. are there enough volunteers. did they send out enough food trucks? where can you find them? how? we found mixed reviews. this woman says the red cross has been superb. >> they're out here every day, they're easy to find. you don't have to go looking and searching, you know they're here. >> for a church group organizer also helping victims, a different take. steve, as you drive around donating supplies, how much of a red cross presence have you seen? >> very little. i've been talking to a few and they're telling us they're trying to get as many people out, but they're stretched very thin. >> the red cross is a huge institution and the leaders say it will cost the organization $100 million by the time all the numbers are in. in its appeals for sandy, the red cross insists every penny goes directly to storm victims. yet on its website, the red cross says only donations will go toward storms like sandy. susan candiotti, cnn for "outfront." >> let us know what you think of susan's excellent reporting. today, i went out to the rockaways. one of the hardest hit areas. i'll show you what we saw there. >>> plus at the center of the david petraeus scandal. who is paula broadwell? how did the two meet and how did she get so close t.o. director of the cia? nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? 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[ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we start the second half of our show with stories we care about, where we focus on our reporting from the front lines and we start with iran's english language press tv. they say the country is conducting a series of military drills. the report says 8,000 troops will be involved. a professor tells us these defense exercises tend to be exaggerated and rather rehearsed. he says it's more of an exercise in communication between the revolutionary guard and other units. the drills come after iran fired an unmanned drone this month. >>> it's been nearly a week since americans went to the polls and hey, the world's strongest democracy, some race, we still don't know who won. for the house, 194 democrats and 234 republicans. five races we still say are too close to call. democrats have a narrow lead in all of them right now. one is for florida's 18th district where patrick murphy declared a victory over alan west. west has not conceded and is pursuing legal action. >>> a couple of weeks ago, you may recall we told you about a company recalling all their products because they had concerns about the is a rility of the company's testing process. well, today we know what the fda found during those inspections. insects within ten feet of where sterile products were manufactured, walls that were cracked and a bird flying in a building where sterile products are stored. they were inspected because it's a sister company to the new england compounding center, that's the pharmacy whose steroid injections have been linked to the fungal meningitis outbreak that's killed 32 people. >>> the international energy agency says the united states could pass saudi arabia to become the world's largest oil producer by 2020. that is pretty incredible. the agency says ten years after that, the united states could be an oil exporter. that means we export more than we're getting out of the ground. but yes, pigs are flying and here's the thing, right now, if you want to export u.s. crude oil, it's really hard to do. you have to cut through a lot of red tape. washington does not make it easy, no matter how lucrative it could be. we spoke to jamie webster. he says this will be an issue for the oil markets within the next 18 months. right now, you're already starting to see pressure from sellers who want to export to places like canning de. pressure will increase as we see light sweet crude inventories grow. all that money could help with this problem. it's been 466 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. what are we doing to get it back? exporting energy would help. so would a deal to keep us from falling over the fiscal cliff. erskine bowles told me earlier, this is truly the magic moment to make a deal. congress, let's get it done. >>> and now, our fourth story "outfront." the woman behind the resignation of general david petraeus. tonight, there are growing questions about the 40-year-old biographer of general petraeus. cnn has learned the affair started two months after petraeus took over the cia, back in september of 2011 and ended about four months ago. "outfront" tonight, chris lawrence on who she is, the woman at the heart of this investigation. >> holly petraeus and broadwell were separated by just five seats at david petraeus' confirmation hearing to become cia director. the affair wouldn't begin for another couple of months, but the attraction was there. a long time friend of petraeus says years in the war zone had left him isolated. petraeus didn't have anyone on his level he could talk to candidly, so when paula broadwell came along, quote, he enjoyed her company. she was an attractive gal and they had things in common. but the friend tells cnn, after the affair destroyed petraeus' career, he reflected on the relationship. and he came to realize broadwell may have been obsessed, and perhaps felt she was warding off the competition, in sending e-mails to petraeus family friend jill kelley. >> i'm not in love with david petraeus. >> broadwell is a west point grad like petraeus. she's appeared often on cnn, including several times on this program discussing security issues. >> sure, it's probably a signal, erin, that we do have visibility on what's going on on the ground there. >> petraeus cultivated smart, competitive people around him. in high school, she was student council president and valedictorian. she would later compete in the ironman competition and earn a ph.d. from harvard. she went to afghanistan when he took over the war and some close petraeus staffers couldn't understand why she got such unprecedented access, but headquarters is a cramped cluster of compartments where petraeus had little to know privacy. officials say nothing inappropriate happened while he was still in uniform. sources tell us paula broadwell was here in washington celebrating her birthday with friends and family when all of this news broke wide open at the end of last week. in fact, one of the last postings on her twitter account is retweeting one of the rules of leadership by david petraeus. chris lawrence, cnn, the pentagon. >> and i want to bring in three reporters who have been looking into the relationship between paula broadwell and general david petraeus. fred kaplin, he slates war stories columnist and author of the upcoming book "the insurgents." spencer ackerman is senior writer for wired 37 and eli lake, senior national security reporter for newsweek and "the daily beast." i want to alert you, and spencer, "washington post" has just posted an op-ed by vernon lobe, who co-authored the book with broadwell. the first sentence, my wife says i'm the most coolest person in america. he says he had no idea about the affair even though he worked with her on this book for 16 months. what are you hearing now about when and how this started? >> i'm hearing a lot of what chris mentioned in the lead-in. a lot of people close to petraeus for a long time found it somewhat strange that paula broadwell got this amount of access, compared to her relatively thin journalistic resume. but none really thought, or were talking at the time, that it was an inappropriate relationship there. at the same time, when the announcement came that he was resigning, and getting to an inappropriate relationship, it seemed to ricochet across people in petraeus' circle that it was probably miss broadwell. >> he writes there was no protege more ardent than broadwell. he talks about himself. he had only one contact. she had all the contact. they had a lot in common. >> she had said they met while she was in grad school at harvard and petraeus came to give a talk and she approached him afterwards, showing great interest. wanting to talk with him more about the subject. you know, if paula broadwell had been the dowdiest young man you could have imagined, petraeus would have been interested in cultivating that person into a possible protogay. he was very much into mentoring. he came out of a tradition that social science department which cultivated relationships with with young men, positions for them to have, so it was not at all surprising that he found her attractive in that sense. initially. >> and what is your understanding as to when this started? it's very crucial for viewers who aren't aware, whether it was before or after he was at the cia. before, it's against the law in the military for him to have had an affair. at the cia, it would be different. so there are different legal ramifications as to when it started. >> that's true. that may be one reason why some of his friends are so adamant that it was after. i do know that there were a lot of people in kabul who were kind of disturbed at the kind of access that she was getting. and how she was traveling around with him a lot. going on early morning jogs with him a lot. being brought into meetings that, listen, petraeus got along with reporters. he liked cultivating reporters. >> he did with all of us. he made us all feel special by how quickly he would respond to e-mails. >> first, he liked them, i guess, but then he saw it as information operations. this was to get the message out. but she was being treated on a level a little bit different. >> and eli, what is your understanding as to the security risk? because that's the big question here about this fbi investigation and we were talking about how the university of denver, she was recently speaking about how there could have been libyans held prisoner in benghazi, related to the benghazi attacks. something nobody else had talked about, and if true, could have been classified and inappropriate and a violation. what's your understanding as to what she might have known? >> the cia denies that claim, but the rest of that speech, she does speak as if she is almost speaking for david petraeus. and at times, kind of acting as a government official would, confirming things that were in press reports, discussing sensitive details. at the end of her answer on benghazi, she says as a former military intelligence official, i'm saddened to see so many sources and methods discloses in that sense. so one thing that always happens when you're looking at an investigation postmortem after something like this, there is a process -- an audit if you will at the cia to determine whether any classified information was, i guess, inappropriately disclosed. if there were lots of conversations with paula broadwell, she may have had the clearances to hear that, but if she then shares that information with the public, then it would present a bunch of problems. >> that's a fair point. spencer, in terms of when this started, that crucial question, you write about an incident at a wedding? >> it seems that at a wedding of some prominent aides to petraeus, there was some concern i should say also former aide to petraeus and people sort of in that circle. there was some concern about the propriety of their relationship. there was some concern about some seeming closeness between the two of them. yet it's difficult to find people who thought this was in fact something more than what it appeared like. the close mentoring relationship that fred described and as eli is talking about, an absolutely crucial question going forward is what information even if she's acting like an unofficial conduit for petraeus, whom she mentions can't speak publicly as head of the cia, might have been passed to her. at what point do people involved in this investigation as we found have since gone to congress and been motivated with that concern. >> all right. well, thanks very much to all three of you. so many questions. and these are the three reporters answering them. >>> "outfront" next, floodwaters take over venice. tonight, the majority of the italian city is under water. >>> plus, today i spent the day in the rockaways, a neighborhood in queens where half the people live under poverty and have been wiped out by the storm that hit two weeks ago. >> we need help. >>> we're back with tonight's [ camera clicks ] ♪ it's hard to resist the craveable nature of a nature valley sweet & salty nut bar. to take a centrum silver multivitamin every day. i told him, sure. can't hurt, right? 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[ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum, always your most complete. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. the wheels of progress. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help. with the experience and service to keep things rolling. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. >>> we're back with tonight's outer circle and we go to venice tonight, where nearly three quarters of the sitcy is under water after being hit by storms and flooding. reuters reports flooding reached five feet. that's the sixth highest level in 140 years. i asked atika shubert how they're fairing. >> well, erin, the canals of venice make it one of the most romantic cities in the world, but also one of the wettest. take a look at these pictures. about 70% of the city is reportedly under water after it was battered by storms and the water levels rose by more than five feet more than normal. in fact, tourists were seen literally swimming in some of the city's most famous piazzas and wooden walkways had to be built to help get around the city. and unfortunately, it's not just a problem of rainfall, the city is actually sinking by about two millimeters a year. and it's become such a chronic problem that locals have a special for it. aqua alta, which means high water, erin. >>> and now, let's check in with >>> and now our fifth story outfront. when planes come in to jfk, they fly over a community we saw desperate for help. >> milk, juices, cookies. there will always be a clothes drive. >> each day, the line outside the thriftway in far rockaway forms early. >> there are elderly who cannot leave their homes. if you can get one to them, i would appreciate it. >> people here wait for hours. not for gas, but for food, water and clothing. a wait that can sometimes be in vain. >> we've been out here for going on three hours now, waiting for this truck that's supposed to have been coming here today at 11:00. >> home to 120,000 people, the peninsula is struggling as thousands are still without power including stores, restaurants and banks. for those who live in a high-rise like this one, they have to walk up 20 flights of stairs. more than half the population lives below the poverty line and most are just trying to get by. william samson waited more than three hours with his grandmother to get food for seven people. >> what are things you wish were different right now? >> i wish for everybody to come together, help each other out, bring supplies you're not needing to give to other people, help the disabled, help the elderly, just help anybody. come out and help. >> with no power, it isn't safe to go out after dark but william says even the gangs have called a truce. >> they all called a truce. they are all actually helping out other people because there's nothing bad you can do in a storm right now. it's already bad as is, so might as well just call a truce, come together, help out. >> alene comes here five days a week to get supplies for her three grandchildren. they're all in wheelchairs with muscular dystrophy. >> my grandkids haven't been home yet because they're all in wheelchairs and they can't come home because we have no lights. since the storm. we have no one to help us. >> the task is daunting. many small groups are cobbling together help, like this medical truck from kansas. people like nia garson is here to help distribute up to 10,000 meals a day donated by a local food company and the red cross. her energy seems bottomless and she has a reason. >> you never know. it could always be you. you know? you just give back. it could be anybody. >> the people in the rockaway peninsula are a close-knit community. local churches are really central to the communities there. many churches were destroyed like st. john's baptist church and it's hard because of the separation of church and state. fema isn't allowed to help the churches and they're the bedrock of where people are turning for help. congressman gregory meeks was baptized at that church and i asked him and pastor j.d. williams how long it's going to take the community to recover. >> it's going to be a long time. this is a symbol of what it is. we are here at st. john's baptist church and it's going to take this church, which is an institution in the community, a long time to get itself back on its feet. it was devastated by this storm. you just look inside and you'll see complete destruction. it's going to take months upon months upon months to get it back together again. >> pastor, this is the largest church here on the peninsula. >> on the peninsula. and we have 15 employees, we did. we have a day care, ministry. the church is open seven days a week, during the week days from monday to friday from 6:00 until 6:00. and now these employees of our church are without a job. the bottom has been completely destroyed. six feet of water destroyed -- >> this bus, right, this is your bus. it went all the way up into the actual bus? >> the van, the air condition system is gone. the boiler system is gone. everything that's in the church on the lower level was under six feet of water. >> and the problem is, religious institution in rockaway is -- for some towns it may be the public school system. we rally around institutions. virtually every church on this peninsula has similar damage. i have toured this peninsula yesterday going from religious institutions to religious institution. they all have this kind of destruction. the community can't move on until we can repair our churches. >> what will you do then? >> a couple days a mother came by the church. she wanted food. we had food here. and she said, pastor, can i just lay on the floor? i have a roof over my head. i said, well, it's cold here. she said, i don't have a home. and that really touched me. and this is not just an isolated case. these are people like that there are desperate. >> if you had to say what you need the most, to have it not feel abandoned, not feel overlooked. what do you need? >> right now, we don't need any more food or water, per se. that's an abundant flow. we need now people to come in the community disaster relief people to give directions. we need someone to find our parishioners. we need finances for the people. not only for the churches, but for the people. if there's jobs available for cleanup, we need to know where that is so we can direct some of the people in the neighborhood to these areas where they may possibly get some temporary employment. we need help. >>> outfront next, a young man i met in the rockaways with a plan. where others fail, droid powers through. introducing the new droid razr maxx hd by motorola. now more than ever droid does. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>> today in the hard hit area of the rockaways, we met andrew samson. he's 17 and was helping his grandmother get supplies. during our conversation he talked a lot about the gangs that have taken ahold of his community and i asked him if he joined one. >> i'm in no gang. i'm a good boy. >> he has a good plan and we discussed that plan today. >> i'm planning to go in the marines first for computer analysis but yeah, after the military, i do my 20 years, i'm going straight into itt tech for more advanced computer technology. >> you're planning for the military and what's after the military. >> yeah. >> what made you decide to go into the military? >> i see a lot of heroes out there doing amazing stuff for the country, so i want to be one of those heroes and do something good for the country.
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Nov 12, 2012 10:00pm EST
cases eight plus hours to vote. because florida is florida, and what it means in american national politics, florida will probably be exhibit "a" for what is wrong with the election system on purpose. it's wrong on purpose, because we know what needs to be done to fix the problems and it's not being done on purpose. but arizona, right now, is a hot and heavy contender at this point for at least exhibit "b." and unlike florida, arizona is still not even done yet. not even with this year's election. stay tuned. there will be more on this. time for "the last word with lawrence o'donnell." have a great night. >>> well, we knew this was going to happen, but i for one, didn't know it would happen this fast. the republican party is now officially at war with the republican party. >> there's a battle brewing over the future of the republican party. >> a war of the worlds. >> republicans drown in a sea of spin. >> post election blues. >> within an echo chamber they lost. >> a time machine. >> they were able to create their own reality. >> this election won't be close. 300 plus for romney. >> 300 electoral votes. >> they were fleeced, exploited and lied to. >> mythology. >> conservative entertainment complex. >> feeding to mythology. >> they think of wombs and wackos. >> wackos, weirdos, and witches. >> have you grover norquist. >> mr. anti tax himself. grover norquist. >> the president elected on the basis he was not romney and romney was a poopy head. >> poopy head. >> he actually said that. >> grover norquist or grover from "sesame street?" >> the fiscal cliff. >> move into high gear this week. >> taxes on the table. >> that's a given. >> some could be splintering. >> we know there has to be revenues. >> they really won't i don't think. >> i think that's a given. >> that suggests compromise. >> republicans might blink on this. >> you don't have to compromise values to come to the table. >> if there was a mandate, it was a mandate to work together. >> america has clearly said they have had enough. >> newton malloy gingrich has been in politics 40 years. 40 long years. and finally -- finally -- newt realizes he doesn't understand america. >> i was wrong last week, as was virtually every major republican analyst. you have to stop and say to yourself, if i was that far off, what do i need to learn to better understand america? >> former bush speechwriter david frum knows who to blame for what happened at the ballot box last week. >> the conservative followers have been fleeced and lied to by the conservative entertainment complex. >> there are no republican party leaders. leaders are several appointed now. one of the self-appointed leaders fought back today. >> just as i predicted, ladies and gentlemen, wait until you hear the sound bites, this election was lost because of your host, rush limbaugh. i am the primary reason, there are others, but i'm the primary reason the republican party, and i am the primary reason the republican party will keep losing, until i am denounced by the republican party. the problem that the republican party gets into is misidentifying the reasons that they lose. >> yesterday, steve schmidt took up the cry against the conservative entertainment complex. >> too many swing voters in the country, when you hear conservative, they think of wombs and wackos. we gave up five u.s. senate seats in the last election cycle by people who were just out there. completely extreme. manifestly unprepared for the offices that they are running for. our elected leaders are scared to death of the conservative entire at the same time complex, the shrill and divisive voices, rejecting the social extremism of the republican party on issue after issue. >> one of the leading lights of the conservative entertainment complex, talk radio host laura ingram told politico blaming talk radio for the problems in the gop elite is hilarious and typical of people who want to continue to get paid to give bad advice to campaigns. right wing anti tax, anti government crusader grover norquist believes there is exactly one person to blame for the republican defeat and it is not rush limbaugh. >> we just had an election, and the house of representatives was committed to keeping taxes low. the president was committed -- elected on the basis he was not romney and romney was a poopy head and you should vote against romney, and he won by two points, but he didn't make the case that we should have higher taxes and higher spending. >> joining me now, one of the generals in the republican civil war, david frum, former george w. bush speechwriter and author of the "e-book "why romney lost and what the gop can do about it." and also david karnecki and crystal ball. what about the final points there? what about mitt romney? didn't mitt romney lose this election for republicans? >> mitt romney, of course, like any defeated candidate, partly the author of his own misfortunate. we have had six presidential elections since 1988, where the republican did not clear 50% of the vote. only once, 2004, did the republican get more than 50%. look at the previous cycles, and the republicans win five of the elections, including the defeat in 1966, 2.5% of the vote. you can make all kinds of criticisms of mitt romney, but barack obama is not exactly the second coming of franklin dell nor roosevelt either. he is a candidate that doesn't say thank you to people who vote for him. the president has built a stronger coalition, and the republican coalition has been in trouble for a long, long time. republicans look at elections like 2010 and 1994 where a third of the election for ate is over one state. and then they are surprised where they don't win when 16% of the election for ate is over age 65. >> what about the argument you will hear, which is romney was not a consistent conservative. had he been a consistent conservative throughout his political career and had had not flip-flopped to conservatism recently, we would have run our test with a solid conservative candidate, and you can't make the argument against conservative republicanism if romney was the standard bearer of that, because he was such a false standard bearer. >> i voted for mitt romney, and i like moderate mitt from massachusetts, and i am perhaps the last person with something good so say about romney care. i thought that was a good basis for a moderate appeal to the country. but what we got here -- i used this phrase before. the people who put the cement overshoes on romney's feet are blaming him for sinking. he was remade to a severely conservative candidate. it wasn't natural to him. he campaigned on a big tax cut, on the ryan plan, on interest rates are too low and ben bernanke is too loose, human life amendment for abortion. this was the platform given to him. now, people who follow politics extremely closely, who knew how they would vote a year ago, they may know that mitt romney is a complicated person with a lot of you innance nuances, but people who tuned in late, they got that mitt romney was a generic republican, and that would force the country in default in 2011. they heard about the ryan plan, the human life amendment and they voted no. they reflected what they heard from romney's mouth, not what was in his heart. >> crystal ball, from where you sit, can the republican party possibly make the moves that david seems to be suggesting that they have to make on policy? in order to appeal to a larger constituency? >> they certainly can. i think it's going to be tough, though, because they sold the base on this idea you have to be ideologically pure, and you have to sort of change who the base is if you're going to get more electable candidates on the primary. i want to touch on something david said. the year that things shifted, before ronald reagan, he 70% top tax rates for top income earners. you had really powerful unions. had you major government abuses of power. now republicans have continued to move right, as democrats have moved right. you point out romney care. that is the basis for the president's health care reform. in a lot of ways, conservative ideas have won the day. we're no longer talking about 70% tax rates, but republicans in response to draw a really stark contrast have moved out further to the right. to move back to the center there, are policy differences, but it requires subtlety and nuances. but it's harder than yelling about death panels and soci socialism. >> the primary voters have been delivering tea party candidates and overthrowing some incumbent senate candidates, ending up with tea party candidates that absolutely cannot win as we saw in indianapolis. so as much as there are leadership questions involved, how do you get control of the republican primary electorate? >> for a party to be defined as cohesive and functional, they have to have the same thought. the problem is, if that the clip you played from limbaugh, the problem is in today's republican universe, there are powerful incentives for opinion shapers like limbaugh not to win elections. rush limbaugh did not need mitt romney to win to have influence, clout, and make money. in fact, he might have more influence, more clout, and make more money if mitt romney loses. and he's feeding talking points for the base. and there is a beautiful built-in excuse for a guy like limbaugh. run an election like there and romney can lose, and it can be that romney isn't conservative enough. or look at one like christine o'donnell in 2010, where they nominated the most conservative candidate and still lost, well, the party establishment abandoned the conservative candidate. either way, you can feed the conserve tiffism, and limbaugh can pit himself against the party establishment, and he doesn't need to tell the base, since he will win an election, and he needs to tell them that they feel good and fighting against the powerful, arrogant establishment. >> david frum, in your e-book, you talk about these members of the conservative entertainment complex, sean hahnity, steve ducey, fox & friends crew, rush limbaugh, how would you expect anything to change in the way that they cheerlead for conservative republican candidates? >> well, i don't know that they will change. but the -- the desire to win, as was just said. the desire to win is a powerful force. america benefits from having a two party system. politics become very zero sum and waking up to what the american electorate is really like, i hair agaear again and a talking to a contemporary just this morning. when we were young, 20-year-olds were the strongest part of the republican coalition. those of us who are 203 0 30 ye ago is still the strongest part. we just got old. what are we offering to today's 20-year-olds? if somebody in 1980 said i should be republican because tom dewey is a hell of a guy, i would barely know who tom dewey was. we are separated today from ronald reagan as i was from tom dewey. there is so much about republicanism and conservative that is compelling and that is appealing to people of all kinds of ethnicities, men and women, sexual orientations of every variety. americans are entrepreneurial, workers, savers, and want the message, but don't want to be told that they belong to 47% that doesn't count. >> david, a real fight on your hands within the republican party. david frum, author of "why romney lost," crystal ball and steve kornacki, thank you for joining me. >>> coming up, the first battle that will be fought in the republican civil war will be over taxes and some republicans are already sounding like liberal democrats on that one. carolyn finney and jonathan capehart will join me. sex, lies, and e-mail brought down the director of the cia. tonight, the story is getting stranger by the hour. the newest twist involves the shirtless e-mails of one of the fbi investigatoinvestigators, a the hour, law enforcement officials have conducted a search of paula broadwell's home in north carolina, which is just step as way from the home of rielle hunter, john edwards' form former mistress. and you pick the price that works for you. great. whoa, whoa, jamie. watch where you point that thing. 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[ grunting ] >>> the first big battle in the republican civil war will be over taxes and some republicans are quickly finding their way to agreement with the president. yes, to raise taxes on the rich. that's going to be next. >>> and, later, the fbi has just conducted a search at the home of paula broadwell, the woman david petraeus has admitted having an affair with. a lot of new developments in the case. stay with us. zeebox would be a double chocolate chip cookie. when they unite...magic. cookie! [ male announcer ] and anyone who thinks otherwise doesn't deserve the extra chocolate chips. download zeebox free, and make magic when you watch tv. "are you a cool mom?" i'm gonna find out. [ female announcer ] swiffer wetjet's pads are better than ever. now they have the scrubbing power of mr. clean magic eraser so you don't have to get down on your hands and knees to scrub away tough, dried-on stains. hey, do you guys think i'm "momtacular" or "momtrocious"? ♪ [ female announcer ] swiffer. now with the scrubbing power of mr. clean magic eraser. >>> the republican civil war is now treading on sacred republican ground. a subject that has always previously united the party. the subject where never a word of dissent is allowed. taxes. >> rates are going up for everyone on december 31st if nothing happens. if you think republicans can win a showdown on preserving all the bush tax rates against a president who just was re-elected on just raising rates on millionaires, good luck. i don't think it's winnable. again, republicans will cave. >> the influential conservative editor of "the weekly standard," bill kristol, is facing the republican civil war. >> what were the top margeinal tax rates under reagan? 39% by it's will not cripple the economy. >> rush limbaugh is trying to fight back, but it doesn't sound like he has much fight in him. >> do the democrats after losing elections, ever say, you know what? we're going to have to cut taxes if we are ever going to get back in touch with the american people. they don't. they don't. we, on the other hand are the exact opposite. we start making tracks to abandoning our principles and loyalists as fast as we can. all to precede them. >> "the new york times" reports on a conference call with house republicans a day after the general election, john boehner said they would continue to staunchly oppose tax rate increases, but on sunday. bill kristolly to republican house members it's not just them versus the president, it's them versus history. >> i think republicans will have to give in much more than they think. four presidents in the last election vo won 50% of the vote twice. roosevelt, eisenhower, reagan, and obama. republicans in the house will be able to get some concessions, but i think there will be a big budget deal next year, and it will be much moran obama budget deal than paul ryan budget deal. elections have consequences. karen capehart, did you expect anything this big this fast? bill kristol is influential with republicans in washington. i'm stunned with what i'm hearing? >> i almost fell out of my chair when boehner said revenues. the idea of increasing revenues. that's a central argument that we have been having over the last four years, and the very expensive i told you so i guess. if we're going to get to this problem, we have to deal with revenues, we can't just do it all on the spending side. >> jonathan capehart, there is bill kristol teaching republicans how to talk about this. but it does involve a word for word refutation of what they said in the past, that higher rates will kill the economy. there is bill kristol pointing out how we've done perfectly fine under higher rates in the past. >> what he's trying to get through to republicans, particularly the new class that came in in 2010, okay, you campaigned on all of these promises, but now it's time to govern and things have come to a standstill in washington over the last two years, and now with the fiscal cliff or fiscal curve coming, and the president being re-elected with more than 50% of the vote, it's time to make a deal. and everyone knows that in order -- that the real deal that economists will view as serious has to be a balanced approach, a mix of cuts and revenue increases. >> and, karen, it is a fiscal curve. i have officially renamed it the fiscal curve on the show. and by the way, we're soliciting the audience to have new designs for fiscal off the curve buttons here and we'll have that as soon as our artists and audience come up with. it happens quite frad you'lly, a little slope, and when we go off it, which i expect we will in the first week of january. nothing big will happen if the first month and it gives the congress plenty of time to rush a solution into place, which i think is the only way that we'll actually make sense to get the democrats the solution they need. >> i think that's right. i think the contours of a deal are out there. now that the republicans are acknowledging that math equals math, which i think, again, the election helped to prove, we're able to have a grownup conversation about these things. look, while they won't say publicly, they all said the political reality is that john boehner is not in the same position to negotiate with the president that he was before. he lost seats. the president won a second term, and the central argument in this campaign was exactly this issue. so they are sort of negotiating with themselves a bit in the public eye. when it comes to sitting down across the table with the president, they will have to get down to brass tacks in a way they didn't before. >> karen finney and jonathan capehart, thank you for joining me tonight. >> thank you, lawrence. >> coming up, breaking news tonight in the investigation of david petraeus, the fbi conducted a search of the home of paula broadwell. we'll have all the breaking news, developments in that case, coming up. ♪ ♪ hi dad. many years from now, when the subaru is theirs... hey. you missed a spot. ...i'll look back on this day and laugh. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. this is awesome. 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[ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. >>> i was told never to beat him. keep up with him, u.s. a riis if passage. you' he's a guy, you're a girl, and he's a legend, and i'm a soccer room. in retrospect, i did beat him. >> every word from paula broadwell now has a double entendre. including the title of her book, entitled "all in." fbi agents are currently at the home of paula broadwell. wcnc-tv in charlotte are reporting that agents arrived at broadwell's home at 9:00 p.m. and took boxes and suitcases and photos from the foam. a spokeswoman confirms the report and says it's a consensual search and not a raid or "a game changer." the fbi official says it is one of the final steps to closing out their investigation of broadwell. also tonight, "the wall street journal" reports new details how the federal bureau of investigation handled the case suggests even as the bureau delve into mr. petraeus' personal life, the agency had to address questionable conduct by one of its own, including allegedly sending shirtless photos of himself to a woman involved in the case. that woman is jill kelly, a family friend of petraeus, who first brought to the fbi's attention troubling e-mails she was receiving from an anonymous e-mail account operated by paula broadwell. we heard from the ghost writer of broadwell's biography of petraeus. he says my wife says i'm the most clueless person in america. lobe says he never knew of the affair, despite working with broadwell for 16 months. i assumed given how public their relationship was he would never engage in risky behavior. he always preached to proteges, is character is what did you when no one was watching and he would hasten to add from his most public of perches that someone is always watching. there was no protege more ardent than broadwell. senator dianne feinstein is growing ever more concerned as the story develops. >> generally, what we call the four corners, the chair and rankings of both committees are briefed on operationally sensitive matters this is certainly an operationally sensitive matter. but we weren't briefed. i don't know who made that decision. and i think, you know, that makes it much more difficult. since then, it's been like peeling an onion, every day another peel comes off and you see a whole new dimension to this. so my concern has actually escalated over the last few days. >> joining me, john meacham, author of "thomas jefferson: the art of power" and jane mayer of "the new yorker." we have been told that broadwell has been cleared, but yet as we sit here, the fbi is completing a search of her house. why would they be searching her house if they have already concluded there is nothing criminal here? >> well, petraeus is cleared as well. i mean, there are many strange aspects of this investigation. and lots still to know. but i have to say, one of the things that i think is really troubling is why this investigation ever became what it is. why did it even take off. why is it public? apparently there have been several reports have come out late today, saying that the squalled threatening e-mails that were sent, it turns out from paula broadwell were not terribly threatening in the first place. they were kind of in the order of sassing this other woman jill kelly and basically telling her to back off a little. but the fbi in tampa that first looked at it, they were really not sure they wanted to get into this thing, because the federal bureau of investigation, snooping into private citizen's e-mail is a very big deal and there ought to be a very high threshold before the government starts looking at private e-mails. it's troubling, but then you find out more and more about the agent that started this probe. turns out to be friends with the woman who came to him and has sent shirtless pictures of himself to her at some point in their relationship. i don't know what that was about, but the agent is now under investigation by the office of professional responsibility at the justice department or at the fbi. there are just a lot of questions about whether this was an appropriate investigation in the first place, let alone with what happened to him later and then "the new york times" has just come up with a story that suggests that this agent that started this again had a really strong political point of view and thought there was some coverup protecting obama, and he wanted this out fast, and it seems like he wanted it out before the election. >> well, john meacham, my sense of what was at stake in this investigation of interest to the fbi was simply that these e-mails were concerning the director of central intelligence and the attentions and interests of the director of the central intelligence agency, it seems there is some minimal threshold met for fbi curiosity at that point. >> i think whether or not there was vulnerability. jane has a very fine piece on "the new yorker" website, and it asks whether vulnerability and blackmail is sort of an outdated topic at this point and concern. however, i will say when you are in the midst of a story and the words shirtless e-mails and nighttime visits by the fbi, you are not in a good place. it's kind of a personal rule of mine. and so when i -- the howard baker question i want to know, i agree with jane about what triggered this. it's sounding more and more like a field office that perhaps did not goo do things the way they should have one would speculate. but to what extent -- what did the attorney general know and when did he know it? if this was kept from the pez, as it appears to have been, as senator feinstein said, who decided that? the cia director, once this is in motion, why was this information not -- or who was making the decision on how widely to share the decision? >> i -- i spoke with somebody over at the justice department about it today, and i'm not sure that they made the wrong call on this. again there, is a lot going on in this story that people don't know, so it's very hard to have a -- a completely firm view on it, but the rules of such investigations, a criminal investigation are that you keep it quiet until someone is -- until there are charges brought there, are innocent people whose reputations can be hurt and there are tremendous privacy concerns, and even for people high up in the government, there are privacy concerns, so i'm not sure it was the wrong thing for the fbi to keep this away from the political people in the administration. it's a very delicate question about what they should have done. in some ways, i think that it makes me wonder -- wouldn't it have been better if petraeus had gone to the president himself? or to the head of national intelligence at a certain point and said i'm -- i'm under investigation and i did these things? that might have been sort of the more valorous way to go. it's very touchy what the justice department -- when the fbi is investigating someone, especially someone who turns out to be innocent, you have to really be careful. >> well, yeah, jane and that's harkening back to the j.ed edgar hoover days, where he was doing an investigation on everyone. but it's a good point about petraeus' own responsibility to possibly bring this to other's attention without an investigation. the sense i'm getting at this point, a man whose life had become out of control, especially for the purposes of doing the job of cia director. sure, he could have done a lot of other jobs in this world by having a girlfriend complaining to some other woman that maybe she's paying too much attention to a guy that she's having a cia director with. when you have that kind of guy in the middle of the triangle, what the president was presented with is a man whose life is too much out of control to run the agency. >> it certainly seems that way. again, it's not -- far from an ideal situation it's safe to say, but i take jane's point about the complexities of this, but this is part of what mystifies me is that the chain of command on this. and also, what -- the triggering event and it sounds more and more that this might be politically motivated and so, if, in fact, one of the early agent has a political motivation, then how does that play into this. and i do think the election timing on the notification, given that -- that once it happens, whether it should have happened or not, or whether it should have been talked about widely in the government, once it was discussed in the government at what point was there a wise decision made not to announceded before the election because of benghazi and other questions? that seems to be one argument. the other argument is that things should have been handled more directly. >> jane mayer, john meacham, thank you for joining us. >> thanks. >>> thanks to voters in the state of washington, prosecutors are dismissing cases against people who possessed marijuana, even though the law doesn't going into effect until next month. and the need for capable leaders is greater than ever. when you see these problems do you take a step back, or do you want to dive right in? with a degree in business from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to go further in your career than you ever thought possible. let's get started at capella.edu you walk into a conventional mattress store, it's really not about you. we have so much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. you can see a little more pressure in the shoulders and in the hips. ... now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. at sleep number we've created a collection of innovations dedicated to individualizing your comfort. the sleep number collection, designed around the innovative sleep number bed - a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the exact comfort your body needs. each of your bodies. so whatever you feel like, sleep number's going to provide it for you. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set and for 5 days only enjoy 36 month financing on selected beds but only through monday. you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. >>> a big win for justice and a big win for the legalization of marijuana in washington state, thanks to voters, next in "the rewrite." and the major recovery of malala. and her father has made an emotional video about her recovery. coming up. rectile dysfunction that could be a question of blood flow. rectile dysfunction cialis for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual activity. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as this may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess with cialis. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or if you have any allergic reactions such as rash, hives, swelling of the lips, tongue or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. yeah. yeah. then how'd i get this... 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[ voice of dennis ] silence. ♪ ask an allstate agent about the safe driving bonus check. are you in good hands? >>> in tonight's "rewrite" another episode of your votes matters. 77 million people who could have voted for president, didn't. there are a few different kinds of nonvoters at the presidential level. first of all, some voters were understandably discouraged by voter i.d. laws and other unique first-time attempts to suppress their votes. i'm not talking about those people tonight. i'm talking about people who could have easily voted and didn't. they include some people who kind of, sort of, mean to vote, but don't get around to it on election day from a variety of reasons to flat tires, to name it. including some legitimate last-minute reasons. another sizable group that don't go out and vote are those who live in intensely red or intensely blue states, where there is absolutely no doubt where the electoral college will be. another group believes there is no big difference between democrats and republicans, that group thinks voting doesn't matter, ever. they are in a word, wrong. there is a huge difference between the democratic candidate for president and the republican candidate for president, on whom they would select for supreme court justices and that is a difference that can have an important affect on our lives for generations to come. there are, of course, about 1,000 other reasons to vote for president. but if none of them move you, then there are always some local issues that have to be resolved on state ballots. now, you saw how complicated some of those can be when i filled out my california ballot, right here on the show with the former california governor gray davis, because i couldn't do it myself. in washington state, initiative measure number 502, to legalize marijuana possession, up to an ounce, for people over the age of 21, was on the ballot. 1,549,928 voted yes for legal e legalizing marijuana in washington state and instantly changed some lives in the process. the measure won 55% of the vote, and days after the election, washington state prosecutors in two counties immediately began rewriting the charges against people who have been arrested for marijuana possession. they now intend to charge them with nothing. prosecutors are now taking action to dismiss charges in all of these simple marijuana possession cases in their jurisdictions. king county prosecutor dan sauterberg will apply the law retroactively to those defendants react arrested before election day. although the effective date is not until december 6, there is no point continuing to seek criminal penalties for conduct that will be legal next month. about 40 cases have been filed in king county which is seattle. those 40 will all be dismissed, and another 135 cases that had not yet been formally charged in court will all be dropped. in pierce county which includes ta tacoma, prosecutor mark linquist said he was dismissing four dozen cases of possession of marijuana. he said the people have spoken through this initiative, and as a practical matter, i don't think you can sell a simple marijuana case to a jury after this initiative passed. in an interview with "the seattle times," the king county prosecutor said i think when the people voted to change the policy, they weren't focused on when the effective date of the new policy would be. they spoke loudly and clearly that we should not treat small amounts of marijuana as an offense. allison holcomb who was the manager -- campaign manager of the campaign to decriminalize minor marijuana possession said she was "incredibly moved" by satterberg's emotion and said the prosecutor showed "incredible courage." more than 220 marijuana possession cases instantly dismissed. more than 220 lives saved from criminal records. allison holchomb is right. it did say some courage for prosecutors to decide to drop those cases and it took wisdom. the collective wisdom of voters to make that happen. 1,549,928, washington state voters, improved the lives of people, instantly. by voting. when people tell you that voting doesn't matter, tell them to talk to those 220 people in washington state who won't be dragged into court for possession of a little bit of weed and tell it to thousands and thousands and thousands of people who for years to come in washington state, will not be arrested for minor possession of marijuana. and let's all thank washington state voters tonight for once again proving that your vote matters. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. boproductivity up, costs down, thtime to market reduced... those are good things. upstairs, they will see fantasy. not fantasy... logistics. ups came in, analyzed our supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> people gathered around the world on saturday to celebrate what the united nations declared malala day for the brave 15-year-old pakistani girl shot on her way to school by the taliban after speaking out in favor of education for girls. as doctors prepare for her next rehabilitative surgery at the british hospital where malala is being treated, released a new video, showing the progress of malala's recovery. she is out of her hospital bed. she is sitting up right. malala's father had a message to the world for the outpouring of support for his daughter. >> i'm awfully thankful to all of the peace loving well wishers of malala who strongly condemn the assassination attempt on malala, who prayed for her health and who support the grand cause of malalauomalala, which freedom of expression. we deeply feel that the heartfelt good wishes of all caste, creed, and color. malala is recovering well and wants me to tell you she has been inspired and humbled by the thousands of cards, messages and gifts that she has received. that helped my daughter's survival and stay strong. her voice is the voice of the people of pakistan and all down trodden and deprived children. if today her voice goes unheard, then coming generations will go without basic human rights and sublime values. >> joining me now is the man who created a now famous 2009 documentary about malala. adam v.malek. adam, there is a movement for malala to receive the next nobel peace prize. 100,000 people have signed a petition at change.org calling for that. what would -- and the deadline for the nominations are february 1st. what -- what would it mean for malala's cause around the world. and what would it mean in pakistan where you spend so much time working for her to be nominated for the peace prize and possibly winning it? >> i mean, the -- one of the most amazing things that's come out of this story is just the -- the amount of attention that malala has received worldwide, but in pakistan, the change we've seen is remarkable. this is a country that has a severe female education priccri and a pretty silent problem for a long time. and since the shooting, and we're still seeing as we saw it over the weekend with malala day, the country is rising up and showing a tremendous amount of support in honor and nudging its government, not just in honor of malala, but nudging the government to see more women educated in pakistan. >> and the -- what has been the effect of malala day? the united nations taking it up to that level? >> so gordon brown, the u.n. education envoy, brought a million signatures to the desk of president zardari in pakistan, and complemented by a million more signatures of pakistanis, and the message is simple enough. it's time to create a solution that can educate women. what does that mean? when we talk about girls' education in pakistan, we're talking about a country where one in five girls are going to school in the region where malala is from. and we're talking about a country with the lowest rate of femality lit race if hfemale il. it's time for the government to focus on it with a lot more attention. to give you a quick example, the government currently spends 2% of its gdp on
CNN
Nov 13, 2012 4:00am EST
between petraeus and his biographer, paula broadwell, in late summer. we'll have more on how in just a moment. so the fbi reportedly knew in late summer that the head of the cia was having an affair, but it wasn't until months later after election day that president obama found out, and the house and senate intelligence committees didn't find out until friday. congressional leaders from both parties are angry, they say they should have been notified sooner that there were potential national security issues. senate intelligence committee chair dianne feinstein said today she is going to investigate why the fbi didn't tell oversight committees about the investigation. >> a decision was made somewhere not to brief us which is atypical. it is very puzzling and i think was a mistake because this thing just came so fast and so hard, and since then, it's been like peeling an onion. every day another peel comes off and you see a whole new dimension to this. >> there's still a lot we don't know tonight. analysts say there's no evidence, no evidence that the affair led to any security breaches a
CNN
Nov 12, 2012 10:00pm EST
discuss we'll have much more on the petraeus scandal tomorrow night, plus my interview with anthony bourdain. "ac 360" starts right now. >> thanks, piers. it's 10:00 on the east coast. we begin with keeping them honest, the scandal that's led to david petraeus resigning from the cia. that's certainly not the first sex scandal to bring down someone in washington, it certainly won't be the last. but tonight there are growing questions about the timing of how the word got out, whether more people in the government should have been told or been told sooner that the fbi was investigating a case involving the director of the cia. we're keeping them honest as we do every night not to take sides, you can get that on other cable news channels, but to look for the truth, the facts. here's what we know right now about who knew what and when. according to "wall street journal" the fbi discovered the affair between petraeus and his biographer, paula broadwell, in late summer. we'll have more on how in just a moment. so the fbi reportedly knew in late summer that the head of the cia was having an affair, but it wasn't until months later after election day that president obama found out, and the house and senate intelligence committees didn't find out until friday. congressional leaders from both parties are angry, they say they should have been notified sooner that there were potential national security issues. senate intelligence committee chair dianne feinstein said today she is going to investigate why the fbi didn't tell oversight committees about the investigation. >> a decision was made somewhere not to brief us which is atypical. it is very puzzling and i think was a mistake because this thing just came so fast and so hard, and since then, it's been like peeling an onion. every day another peel comes off and you see a whole new dimension to this. >> there's still a lot we don't know tonight. analysts say there's no evidence, no evidence that the affair led to any security breaches and that there are strict fbi protocols about who gets notified in this kind of investigation. but the timing of when the scandal broke right after election day and right before petraeus was scheduled to testify in the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, that certainly has a lot of people asking a lot of questions, understandably. the other angle to the story is an age-old tale of an affair between a highly respected man in washington and a younger woman. in this case, the woman who literally wrote the book on the general, paula broadwell. the two met when she was a graduate student at harvard. she later travelled to afghanistan, interviewed petraeus, sometimes interviewing him. interviews that led to the book "all in the education of general david petraeus." the revelation about the affair is bringing new interest in all the interviews broadwell did to promote the book and what she said about petraeus at that time. take a look. >> he at the end of the day is a human, and is challenged by the burdens of command and has mastered wearing the mask of command, if you will. so he has this mask of command, you think he's really confident, but i got to see a more personal side. i'm not in love with david petraeus. >> he is quite a physical specimen. he really loves to work out. >> at the agency they called him genetic mutant. this project started as my dissertation. i was working with general petraeus virtually, doing interviews via e-mail. i'm not a spokesperson for him. if showing a role model to other people in the world or other readers is a repugnant thing, i'm sorry, but i think the values he upholds and tries to instill in his organizations are valuable and worth pointing out. >> that was paula broadwell then. she has not spoken subsequently. as we said, the timeline of the scandal, who got notified and when, is now under the microscope. cnn intelligence correspondent suzanne kelly has more on that. >> reporter: according to a friend of petraeus, the affair began in november last year, two months after the retired general took the helm at the cia. that same friend also reports that meetings between the two were infrequent, but at some point, petraeus and broadwell began communicating via personal e-mail accounts. e-mails that a government official describes as explicit. skip ahead to may of this year. that's about the time a government official says broadwell began sending threatening e-mails to jill kelley, described as a family friend of petraeus, who lives in tampa, warning her to stay away. that official tells us that kelley shared her concerns over the threatening nature of the e-mails with a friend of the fbi, and that prompted an investigation. sometime after petraeus became aware of the e-mails, a government official says petraeus told broadwell to stop sending them. and sometime around july, according to the friend of petraeus, the affair ended. the source tells cnn that petraeus indicated broadwell might be obsessed with him and broadwell may have felt she was warding off the competition by sending e-mails to kelly. at some point, broadwell and petraeus were interviewed by the fbi and it was after that that things began to unravel quickly. the "wall street journal" says broadwell was interviewed in september and attorney general eric holder knew about the investigation then. a senior intelligence official says director of national intelligence james clapper was notified of the investigation by the fbi last tuesday, election day, just as some polls were beginning to close. that same source says that on wednesday, clapper notified the white house. petraeus met with the president last thursday and offered his resignation, which was accepted as the ordeal became public on friday. >> suzanne kelly joins me from washington. i just got something literally on my iphone. this is from the "wall street journal." i'm going to read this to you. a federal agent who launched the investigation that ultimately led to the resignation of david petraeus was barred from taking part in the case over the summer due to superiors' concerns he had become personally involved in the case according to officials familiar with the probe. the fbi officials found that he has sent shirtless pictures of himself to miss kelly, according to people familiar with the probe. so that is certainly another strange piece in this puzzle. how does he fit in, he's the one who initially raised concerns about this, correct? >> well, i haven't seen this so i have to be very up front with you right now and just say that i'm not sure that this individual is the same person that you're talking about but i can tell you for sure that there are so many strange things just like what you've just read that keep coming out about this. one of them, too, that we haven't talked much about yet is that we know how dedicated that paula broadwell was to sort of becoming the champion, i don't know if it was the self-appointed champion or not, of david petraeus but we know she was interviewed by the fbi in late summer as we just mentioned, but she reached out to cnn even last week, last monday, the day before the election, when james clapper found out about the affair, and offered to write an article and submit an article to us about it was general petraeus' 60th birthday and she wanted to write something about his leadership style. clearly even when she reached out and made that offer to cnn, she knew that people knew about the affair and she may not have known it was coming out publicly but she knew about the affair. >> paula broadwell's claims in a speech last month that the cia was holding prisoners in benghazi, that's a big deal. is there any reason to believe that it's true and whether it is or isn't, how would she have had that information? >> well, that's a bombshell accusation. as you know, the cia lost its ability legally to detain people so for paula broadwell to go out in public and say that the cia was holding prisoners and that that prompted the attack at benghazi that killed the american ambassador is huge. she didn't give her source when she made that speech and she also said that it was unveted material so that raises the very serious issue of the kind of access that she had to the director of the cia. we don't know if that information came from him, but just knowing how close the two of them were, and that oftentimes, you know, if you needed a response on something, even as a journalist, you would go to paula to get it because they're a lot quicker than the office of public affairs at the cia. she had that kind of instant access to him. >> stay with us. i want to bring in cnn national security contributor fran townsend and member of the cia's external advisory committee. fran recently visited libya with her employer, mcandrews forbes. also joining us, cnn contributor and former fbi assistant director, tom fuentes. fran, what do you make of this? as it's evolved and what we know right now? >> first of all, on the benghazi claim, she made that they were holding prisoners there, we should say the cia has denied that, saying it's untrue. look, this is a real problem for the morale and continuity of the cia. they have been through something like seven directors in eight years. this is not -- they lived through worse. they lived through the bombing where they lost members but the problem is the death by a thousand cuts. the clip you played by dianne feinstein suggests she calls it peeling layers of an onion. what we don't know is the whole story, the facts of the story. this jill kelley, it's sort of odd these harassing e-mails. why would a private citizen getting harassing e-mails merit the attention of the fbi at all? much less when they looked at it and saw there was no direct threats in it, why did they continue that investigation? >> it seems like from everything i read, i'm just citing this "wall street journal" report i just read, this initial fbi agent who according to the "wall street journal" was barred from further investigation and allegedly sent shirtless pictures to miss kelley, she approached him again according to the "wall street journal" and he's the one who kind of started the ball rolling with the fbi. but again, there's still a lot more to know about her relationship with this fbi agent, also her relationship with david petraeus. what at this point do you not understand about this, that you would like to know? >> look, there are many questions about the relationship of all of these individuals to one another, but i am troubled by the fact, the fbi requires a predicate to open up a preliminary inquiry which is apparently what they did in this case, and it's not clear that's an internal process to the fbi. did they meet that predicate and why, what was it about it, if this was -- you understand once they realized it's in some way related to david petraeus, why they continued to then try to get it resolved. but why did they really open this up, and was there sufficient basis. i think people are troubled by that because of how frequently we all use e-mail and you want to have some confidence there's a predicate to it. >> tom, what about that? why would the fbi begin to look into a citizen who says they're getting harassing e-mail? i get harassing e-mails all the time. it never occurred to me to contact the fbi about it. >> harassing is one thing, threatening is another. we don't know the exact content of these messages to the degree of the threat. but the agent that received it on a personal basis received the initial complaint from kelley, reports that in the office, the tampa office of the fbi, it's not that he's barred from the case although he did have a personal relationship with the complainant so it would go to somebody else more objective, but he didn't have the expertise so it goes to the cybersquad who is going to try to identify who is the sender, because the e-mails were anonymously sent. so that would require subpoenaing the records of the sender to identify who is that person, who else are they in contact with, are they threatening others. that is not something -- >> why is the fbi -- >> because it's over the internet, the fbi would also have jurisdiction in this matter. so in this situation, to get those records, they would be working in consultation with the u.s. attorney's office in tampa to go forward with that case. if the u.s. attorney's office sees those initial e-mails and said this doesn't rise to the threshold of a criminal violation, if you identify the person, we don't think it's enough to even prosecute that person, that would be the end of the case. the fbi would not continue the case. it never would have gotten to director petraeus. >> do you buy it? >> no. see, what the fbi -- the fbi got authority under the current foreign intelligence surveillance act to issue national security letters. they can do that inside the fbi without going to a u.s. attorney. my point is there may have been a predicate here, but it's not clear that there was. if the fbi is going to investigate every harassment case, because it's on the internet, they're going to be shut for business and not be able to do anything else, right? so you make judgments about when is there a predicate and is this a priority. that's not clear until you trace this for awhile and get to petraeus, and the question i'm raising is why, what was the predicate, why did they pursue it. >> once it gets to petraeus, tom, and i want your expertise here, what would happen? because i would imagine as soon as they realized david petraeus is involved, there must be a whole series of hoops they have to jump through or markers they have to hit. >> once they identified paula broadwell as the sender of the messages to kelley, then they subpoena the rest of her records and they see an exchange of anonymous e-mails between her and another party who they didn't identify immediately, and so they subpoenaed those records, they turn out to be the records of director petraeus. that's what leads to that part of it. when they identify that it's him, they're going to look at the content of those e-mails to see is he being extorted, is he being threatened, is he either violating the law criminally or breaching national security even though he's on unclassified e-mail systems. so that would lead to the continued investigation which ultimately led to the interviews of director petraeus and broadwell by the fbi, where they basically admit that they've had a personal relationship, that they were having an affair, and it goes forward. now, as the investigation progresses, they basically determine that there's not enough, the u.s. attorney's office and department of justice determine it just doesn't quite meet the threshold that they're going to prosecute broadwell for the messages she sent kelley, and they find no evidence of a criminal violation on the part of director petraeus and they can find no breach of security committed by him. >> right. so i guess the question is why would he need to resign? beyond the damage to his family and wanting to -- i mean, if there's not some other shoe dropping, if there's not more to this, why resign? >> i think some of that comes down to paula broadwell on the monday posted this thing on the internet about petraeus' life lessons. number five is we all make mistakes. admit it, own up to it, take responsibility, learn from it and move on. and i think some of it he wanted to deal with the family issue. i think he also felt personally a violation of his own code of ethics. he realized he had let himself down. he had to deal with that and he would have if he had stayed, i think he could have stayed, to your point, but if he had stayed, he would have -- the agency would have been dealing with this press issue for a very long time. every time he stepped out of a car, every time he went on the hill, you would have had to deal with it and i think his respect and love of the work of the agency also suggests he needed to go. >> i appreciate you being on tonight. tom fuentes as well. suzanne kelly as we mentioned, appreciate your reporting. as we mentioned, some in congress are questioning the timing of the resignation, criticizing the fbi for not letting them or the president know sooner. joining me is congressman peter king. you said the elements of the story quote don't add up. to you, what does not add up? >> first of all, what fran said, the fact this became an fbi investigation to begin with, then to me, once director petraeus came within the scope of the investigation, it's almost unprecedented for the fbi to be investigating the director of the cia. if they were going to do that, they should have immediately gone to the attorney general and also to the president of the united states because david petraeus was a key part of the president's foreign policy team. i'm not talking about guilt or innocence. i'm saying he's under a cloud. i have great admiration for david petraeus. i urged him to run for president. i worked with him. he's a tremendous patriot. but once he came under this scope of the investigation, they had to have -- they should have notified the president because david petraeus was involved in some of the most sensitive negotiations around the world. >> the "wall street journal" is reporting as you know that holder, the attorney general, knew about it in september. >> first of all, i think it should have been earlier than that because this investigation started a few months before that but assume it's september. at that stage, the attorney general should have immediately gone to the president. it's the president that runs foreign policy, not the attorney general. >> do you think politics was at play here, not wanting to do this before the election? >> that could have been. if that's the case it was a real dereliction of duty because the president is commander in chief. if the attorney general kept essential information from him which i think prevents him from carrying out his job as commander in chief, the attorney general has failed terribly to carry out his job. if the president did find out about it and didn't act on it until after the election, that's equally wrong. if holder knew about it, the attorney general knew about it in september, i believe he had the absolute obligation to tell the president in fairness to the president what was happening. >> you're chairman of the house homeland security committee. based on what you know now, do you believe national security has been compromised in any way by this affair? the fbi says it hasn't. >> we don't know enough yet. the fact is that the investigation was going on, they didn't know at that time whether it did or did not. that's when they should have gone to the president, told him what they had and let the president decide. mostly on the side of the intelligence committee. the fact is they did not know how far this was going to go and that's when they should have gone to the president because there were still so many sensitive -- so much sensitive negotiations that david petraeus was involved in, so many important meetings he was holding around the world. then when we had benghazi, i think if we on the intelligence committee had known about this investigation going on, we may have looked at david petraeus, the evidence he gave us, somewhat differently because most of what he told us then has pretty much been disproven since, and again, i think we may have looked at that differently. i'm just putting that out there, as something to consider. because we had no idea this was going on. certainly the chairman and ranking member didn't and i think they should have been and by past precedent, they always have been. >> how do you think it would have altered how you viewed his testimony on benghazi? >> well, if he knew that he was being investigated, for instance, if david petraeus was aware of that, he may have again tried to either tailor the testimony or modify it or do something which is not going to draw attention to himself. human nature, if you know there's a massive investigation going on, which could bring down your career, you may be less inclined to go all out. or all? . >> this thing that broadwell had mentioned about cia holding prisoners in benghazi and that might have been the reason behind the attack she said was kind of unsourced or unverified information. do you think there's any truth to that and b, do you think she was just kind of -- if there's no truth to it, do you think she was just talking based on, you know, trying to make herself look more important than she was? >> well, again, as a member of the intelligence committee, i can't comment on whether that's true or false but i will say in any event it was inappropriate for her to be talking that way. if she thought it was true she shouldn't have said it and if not, she certainly, should not have been making it up. >> fran raised questions about why the fbi initially got involved. you have similar questions. you mentioned it just briefly about why they would investigate allegedly harassing e-mails by one citizen to another. >> yeah. it seemed because there was a personal friendship between jill kelley and the fbi agent, that's what brought this along. if everyone who receives harassing e-mails got an fbi investigation as fran said, we are at cyberwar with china and libya -- china and iran, and if we are going to waste our time on something like this, which again, maybe there was something threatening there but it really seems unusual in view of the cast of characters involved. to me, that was abuse and also, whoever the fbi agent was who came and told the congressman, who told congressman kantor, he was breaching the investigation, ethics of the investigation. the fbi i don't think handled itself well at all. >> still a lot of questions, obviously. congressman king i appreciate you being on tonight. >> thank you, anderson. >>> we are talking about this on twitter right now. @andersoncooper, follow me there. >>> coming up, i will talk with retired army colonel steven boylan, who has talked to general petraeus since all of this happened. details when we continue. but phillips' caplets don't. they have magnesium. for effective relief of occasional constipation. thanks. 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>> well, good to be with you. wish it was under different circumstances. >> yeah. >> we spoke at length throughout the past couple days. one that as everyone knows, he did have the affair. it started about two months after he was director of the cia and ended as you have reported about four months ago. he deeply regrets the harm and the damage he's brought to his family as i don't think anyone can really fathom or imagine what they are going through at this point. and also, the damage that this did to what he sees as one of the best jobs ever that he held as the director of the cia, working with the fantastic organization, best in the world. >> do you know what lengths he went to cover up the affair? i understand there was kind of, you know, anonymous e-mail accounts with a drop box, they would leave a message in and then eliminate so there was no record of it, and did keeping the affair secret interfere with his work at all? >> well, we haven't gone into any great details about how they communicated other than there were personal e-mail accounts that existed, as everyone is aware of at this point. i don't believe based on my discussions with him and knowing him that there was any crossover between his personal life that he was having with paula and his duties that he was carrying out as director of the cia, and i would like to make it clear that again, based on our conversations, that at no time did he provide paula with any classified information. >> can you characterize, i mean, his relationship with miss kelley? do you know why miss broadwell would have allegedly been harassing her? >> i don't know specifically. i think we're going to have to wait for paula to make any statements that she wishes. but as far as a relationship between the petraeuses, both holly and david petraeus and the kelleys, they got to know the kelleys when general petraeus at the time became the commander of central command. the kelleys are, my understanding, an influential couple in the tampa bay area. they threw a dinner party to kind of introduce the petraeuses to the community. they got to know each other through fund-raising events that holly petraeus was involved in and others. she's been described to me by david petraeus as an individual who has a great deal of energy and drive and support for the local military community down there and that's how they got to know each other. they still do to this day. >> colonel, the general knew for months that the fbi was aware of his affair, from all the reporting on this. you've said his affair with paula broadwell ended four months ago. do you know why he just publicly acknowledged it last week? did something trigger that? if he was aware it was being investigated for months, did he consider resigning earlier? >> we haven't discussed the timing of it. i can only kind of surmise based on knowing him a little bit that once he knew that this was probably going to become bigger than what it was, and i don't mean to be, you know, make light of it, but he felt that it was time for him to step down and resign. if you know david petraeus and it was discussed earlier in the program, part of his internal makeup would be that he would not be able to lead an organization after this kind of an event, so he tendered his resignation which was accepted the day after he gave it. >> i think there are some people, though, who are supporters of david petraeus who would say, why not stick it out? a lot of people have respect for him, democrats and republicans, like the job he was doing. plenty of people in the world have affairs, why step down, if this is all there was? >> well, if you think back to who is david petraeus, for 37 plus years, he was in uniform, and the code of ethics, the values that the military uphold is you don't have an affair. i think this goes back to the core of what and who david petraeus is. he had an affair, he has admitted it, he brought it out publicly. he deeply regrets the action and the poor decision making on his part and the poor judgment that he showed in that manner, but he felt that the way to help correct this was to resign. >> as you know, the general obviously was deeply involved in the ongoing investigation, the attacks on benghazi. he was scheduled to testify later this week. did he tell you whether or not he still intends to give testimony at a later date? >> he has not. my understanding is that -- there have been a lot of people questioning the timing of this, as you brought out. my understanding in conversations with him that this had nothing to do with benghazi. at a certain point, he made a decision to, along with the dni, that he would tender his resignation at the earliest opportunity he had to do that was i believe thursday when he met with the president and discussed it and then the president as we all know accepted his resignation on friday. >> appreciate you coming on and talking about it. thank you so much. >> thank you for having me. >>> general petraeus is certainly not alone. when we come back, why powerful men risk their careers, reputations and families by having affairs. i don't spend money on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... alriwoah! did you get that? and...flip! yep, look at this. it takes like 20 pictures at a time. i never miss anything. isn't that awesome? uh that's really cool. you should upload these. i know, right? that is really amazing. the pictures are so clear. kevin's a handsome devil that phone does everything! search dog tricks. okay, see if we can teach him something cool. look at how lazy kevin is. kevin, get it together dude cmon, kevin take 20 pictures with burst shot on the galaxy s3. >>> two full weeks after sandy hit, we found unused generators outside a 14-story building that's still without power in queens. no one's bothered to hook them up. they've been sitting in the building's parking lot for days. we're keeping them honest. >>> breaking news tonight. according to the "wall street journal" the fbi agent who launched the investigation that led to david petraeus' resigning is now being investigated. the "wall street journal" says there were concerns at the fbi that the agent may have been obsessed with the case and he was barred from it in the summer. the strangest part, the agent allegedly sent shirtless pictures of himself to jill kelley, the woman on the right who was allegedly being harassed by e-mail by paula broadwell, the woman on the left there. we're also learning more tonight about the content of those e-mails. a source says in the e-mail -- broadwell accused kelley of inappropriate behavior near the military base where she did volunteer work. as the story gets stranger by the day, there's no denying general petraeus had it all, a storied military career, seat at the top of u.s. intelligence and a long marriage, the father of two children now adults. why would you put all that on the line by having an extramarital affair? only he can answer that question. however, history will forever note that he was forced from power by his behavior. in that respect, he is certainly not alone. here's martin savidge. >> reporter: politics and sex scandals are nothing new in the u.s. in fact, they date back to our country's beginning. >> of course, look, if you wanted to see what our founding fathers' behavior was like in philadelphia in 1776, we may not like all of the answers. >> reporter: more recently, president john f. kennedy's affairs were notorious. lyndon johnson was such a man with the ladies that he allegedly had a buzzer installed in his congressional office to alert him when lady byrd johnson was on the way. journalists never reported on such things back in the day, but that eventually changed. so did technology. recently, it's the digital footprint of dalliances that led to spectacular falls. remember congressman anthony weiner, who tweeted a photo of his privates. when the story broke, he denied it, claiming his twitter account had been hacked. eventually he confessed and resigned. >> i apologize first and foremost to my wife and to my family. >> reporter: there was client number nine, aka eliot spitzer, the governor of new york and former cnn anchor. when investigators followed his money, it revealed he spent thousands as a regular client of a call girl. he, too, stepped down. >> i have acted in a way that violates my obligations to my family and that violates my or any sense of right and wrong. >> reporter: and now comes general petraeus. done in by a simple click of the mouse. >> e-mail traffic, it's amazing that e-mail is still being used in such a careless and reckless fashion, because it's just evidence against you. >> reporter: modern science can also play a role. remember president clinton and the dna discovered on a certain blue dress belonging to a white house intern, monica lewinsky. >> i did not have sexual relations with that woman, miss lewinsky. >> reporter: if technology makes hiding an affair almost impossible, why do powerful people still think they get away with it? >> it's about narcissism and the will to power and people that strive that mightily and they start believing their own press. they start feeling omnipotent. >> reporter: of course, they aren't omnipotent. a general's fall from grace comes with collateral damage called families. martin savidge, cnn. >>> a lot of damage indeed. tonight, a question we won't stop asking until we get some answers. where is the power for nearly 60,000 new yorkers who are now heading into a third week with no heat, no lights and for some, no running water? we're keeping them honest next. ç >>> massive deadly explosion rocks an indiana neighborhood. could natural gas or a faulty furnace have caused the blast? the latest on the investigation ahead. >>> another keeping them honest report now. it's been a full two weeks as you know since super storm sandy blasted ashore and five days since the nor'easter that followed. yet tonight we're asking the same question that we were asking all last week, where's the power? what's taking so long to fix the misery that so many people are enduring? tonight, nearly 60,000 people are still without power in new york, no heat, no electricity, no phone service, and for some, not even running water. their anger understandably is boiling over, much of it aimed squarely at the long island power authority. >> i can't get power, heat, garbage pickup, nothing? >> all we need is help. i'm a taxpayer. i don't get this. i pay my mortgage. i do the right thing. i don't take from the government. but i need the government to help me now. >> we go to bed at night shivering, wearing tons of clothes every single night. we have not seen one truck come down the block. not one. i have not seen any on any of these blocks. >> the long island power authority supplies power to most of the areas still in the dark, including the rockaways neighborhood of queens. at a town hall style meeting yesterday in the rockaways, residents tried to get answers. remember, they are now heading into their third week without power. today, cnn's victor blackwell tried to find out why a 14-story apartment building in the rockaways still has no power. it's called ocean village. victor found someone who works for the building's management. here's how that went. >> reporter: can you tell me why the power hasn't been restored in this building? is that something you control? you're in management with the company? >> yes. >> reporter: okay. what's your name? >> michael presh. >> reporter: people have been here for two weeks -- >> no comment, sir. i apologize. it has to be run through the rest of our public outreach organizations. >> reporter: you understand the frustration that they look around them, everyone else has power. >> could you excuse me for a moment, please? >> that's how that went. incredibly, there were actually generators sitting unused in the building's parking lot. they're not connected to anything. they are enormous generators and have been there since saturday night. the building's management told cnn through its pr firm that work will begin tonight to hook up the generators and they hope to have power restored tonight. we'll see. they also said because ocean village is a private complex, doesn't get federal help as quickly as public housing does. it's not just ocean village, though. residents on long island held protests this weekend as well. anger is epidemic. >> i want some information. how long can this go on for? >> nobody knows nothing in the building. save your breath. nobody knows nothing. >> no one has any answers. there's no communication as to if it's going to come back in a day, two weeks, a month. >> infuriating, the lack of communication from this company. today, new york governor andrew cuomo indicated it won't be any time soon for many. he said roughly 58,000 customers won't be able to get back power until repairs can be made to their damaged homes. every day since sandy hit, we've asked lipa to come on the program. today we got the same response they have given every single day. they told us they quote, can't make anyone available at this time. the statement on their website said, i quote, lipa continues the massive effort to restore electricity to all customers. we will continue to work 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with over 9,400 linemen and tree trim crews dedicated to getting power restored. in case anyone in management is from lipa is watching, it's not the linemen who people have an issue with. they are grateful when they do show up. it's you guys, it's the management who is not communicating at all with people. half of those 58,000 lipa customers who won't get power until their homes are repaired live in the rockaways. i want to show you how close that is to midtown manhattan, where we are. we used times square as a reference point. the rockaways are to the east in the borough of queens. the area is a known flood zone, a mandatory evacuation zone as sandy approached. not everyone left. some of them stayed, the frailest with urgent medical needs. debroah feyerick reports. >> reporter: when the water rose, people who chose to ride out the storm had no choice to evacuate. >> it was a war zone. there were patients everywhere. there was stuff trying to figure out who people were and what they needed. ems was lined up with stretchers out the ambulance door. they couldn't even get into the emergency room. it was horrible. >> reporter: the rockaways has one of the highest concentration of elderly and disabled adults in the country. people vulnerable, even on a good day. they went to the one place they knewhey would get help. st. john's episcopal hospital, high ground, 14 feet above sea level. >> they couldn't power their medical devices and they needed electricity to power their ventilators and they needed oxygen. some patients just needed a roof. some missed dialysis, some missed their medications and needed insulin. >> reporter: for all their efforts, st. john's says it might be on the hook for as much as $3 million for helping. why? medicare clearly says it will not pay hospitals for people medically well enough to be discharged. rick brown is chief operating officer. >> any medicare patient that was in the hospital, if they came from a nursing home because the nursing home got evacuated, that patient does not meet what medicare calls acute care criteria to be in acute care hospital, so we will not get paid by them. >> reporter: so basically, you opened your doors to a lot of people who needed help and you may have to eat that cost. >> that's probably true. >> reporter: what's more, brown says he was stunned to learn that a new york city hotline alerted people they could find shelter at st. john's. >> he has this whole hospital area in his own house. >> reporter: one of those was jose martinez, who uses a ventilator to keep him breathing, and who had to be evacuated after the storm hit. how quickly did you realize you were in serious trouble? >> well, we didn't realize it until my wife went to the basement. she was folding some clothes in the laundry. all of a sudden she heard water dripping. so she looked around to see where it was coming from. she found out it was coming from the window, through the window. >> reporter: more than 1300 people work at st. john's. a number of them live in hard-hit areas and lost their homes. like the hospital's chaplain, they, too, pray for a miracle. before this crisis, we were nip and tuck, shall we say, in terms of our finances, just getting by and there really won't be a way for us to survive this unless there are some gracious angels and the federal government and state government come up with a different formula for reimbursement. >> the government was telling people to go to that hospital, yet medicare won't reimburse the hospital. will the hospital get any of that money back? >> reporter: well, under medicare, no. but under fema, i spoke to an official there, they said that st. john's hospital is eligible but it's too soon in the process to tell. they are going to have to apply and see how much money they get, if they get any. so it's still very much the beginning, anderson. >> that's a long road for a lot of people. thanks. >>> still ahead, disturbing video that went viral. a judge caught on tape beating his teenaged daughter with a belt. you may remember this video. now there's a new twist to the story. details ahead. just have to fire roast these tomatoes. do you churn your own butter too? what? this is going to give you a head start on your dinner. that seems easier sure does who are you? [ female announcer ] new progresso recipe starters. five delicious cooking sauces you combine with fresh ingredients to make amazing home-cooked meals. ♪ ambiance [ female announcer ] new progresso recipe starters. your head-start to home cooked. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benefits with the risks. all prescription nsaids, like celebrex, ibuprofen, naproxen, and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. they all may increase the chance of heart attack or stroke, which can lead to death. this chance increases if you have heart disease or risk factors such as high blood pressure or when nsaids are taken for long periods. nsaids, including celebrex, increase the chance of serious skin or allergic reactions or stomach and intestine problems, such as bleeding and ulcers, which can occur without warning and may cause death. patients also taking aspirin and the elderly are at increased risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers. do not take celebrex if you've had an asthma attack, hives, or other allergies to aspirin, nsaids or sulfonamides. get help right away if you have swelling of the face or throat, or trouble breathing. tell your doctor your medical history and find an arthritis treatment for you. visit celebrex.com and ask your doctor about celebrex. for a body in motion. >>> i'm isha sesay with a 360 bulletin. a mystery in indianapolis. officials still don't know what caused a house to blow up saturday night, killing at least two people and injuring seven others. the blast was so powerful, that up to 80 neighboring homes were damaged. a bomb has been ruled out and there were no reports that gas was leaking prior to the blast. >>> a "360" follow, a controversial texas judge is reportedly being reinstated to the bench. judge william adams was suspended after this video showing him beating his daughter with a belt was posted on the internet. this happened back in 2004, but the video was only posted last year by adams' daughter, hillary. he was not charged. >>> the man who gives the voice to elmo has taken leave from sesame street. he denies allegations that he had an inappropriate relationship with a teenaged boy. sesame street says it found the allegations unsubstantiated and granted him time off to defend his reputation. >>> most of venice was flooded today. nine inches of rain fell in just four hours. anderson? >> isha, thanks. >>> next, a special veterans day tribute to world war ii veterans. [ female announcer ] e-trade was founded on the simple belief that bringing you better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. >>> veteran's day was yesterday, the 11th day of the 11th month. because veteran's day was sunday it's officially observed today. we have a story about harold van huglette. he's a veteran of world war ii, who is 93 years old today. towards the end of the war, he composed a symphony but put it away. his son found it, sent it to congress and after all these years, it is finally being performed. >> now we will perform for you the world premiere of the van huevlin symphony number 1. >> in 1945, i was stationed in new orleans, louisiana at the new orleans army air base and i was an instructor. a piece in europe had already been written in april of that year so they said we could do anything we wanted to. i decided to write a symphony. during those 70 years when it sat on the shelf, i would look at it every once in awhile and think why isn't this being played? ♪ >> this is such a special day for me and one that i never, ever expected to see. >> each year on the 11th day of the 11th month, we pause as a nation and as a people to pay tribute to you, to thank you, to honor you, the heroes over the generations who have served this country of ours with distinction. >> veterans day as somebody who wrote a blank check and had the ability to write that check to the united states of america that they would give up their life for americans. >> this is the first veterans day in a decade in which there are no american troops fighting and dying in iraq. after a decade of war, our heroes are coming home. >> just being back with my family is beautiful. >> on this day we thank all of our veterans from all of our wars. not just for your service to this country but for reminding us why america is and always
ABC
Nov 13, 2012 7:00am PST
in the middle of the case? plus, federal agents descend overnight on paula broadwell's home. >>> happening now, emergency on the mountain. two snowboarders stranded in a blizzard for two nights on mt. rainier, sending distress calls from a snow cave. searchers racing to track them down before it's too late. >>> millionaire business titan on the run. we know him as the man who developed the software that protects our computers. now he's accused of killing his neighbor. he speaks out about why he's hiding from police this morning. >>> and she's just 12 singing with a turkey leg. meet the new viral sensation. starring in this explosive holiday music video. but this is the latest contender for worst song ever? she's getting face, whether you like it or not. ♪ >>> good morning, everyone. hello to robin. as you all know, she's recovering from her bone marrow transplant. welcome back to amy robach. and, boy, you really need a flowchart to keep track of the sex scandal. let's get it all straight. it's cost david petraeus his job. and now, overnight, the commanding general of ameri
CNN
Nov 12, 2012 8:00pm EST
organizations are valuable and worth pointing out. >> that was paula broadwell then. she has not spoken subsequently. as we said, the timeline of the scandal, who got notified and when, is now under the microscope. cnn intelligence correspondent suzanne kelly has more on that. >> reporter: according to a friend of petraeus, the affair began in november last year, two months after the retired general took the helm at the cia. that same friend also reports that meetings between the two were infrequent, but at some point, petraeus and broadwell began communicating via personal e-mail accounts. e-mails that a government official describes as explicit. skip ahead to may of this year. that's about the time a government official says broadwell began sending threatening e-mails to jill kelley, described as a family friend of petraeus, who lives in tampa, warning her to stay away. that official tells us that kelley shared her concerns over the threatening nature of the e-mails with a friend of the fbi, and that prompted an investigation. sometime after petraeus became aware of the e-mails, a gov
CNN
Nov 13, 2012 4:00pm EST
he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. a clinic spokesperson says he is no longer being treated there. he is at the center of a federal investigation of misuse of campaign funds and won re-election in his district last week. he is out of the mayo clinic. >>> it is time for "the situation room" and wolf blitzer. wolf? >> ted, thanks very much. happening now. another top commander in a widening scandal swirling around general david petraeus. john allen is now the subject of a pentagon investigation. it centers around hundreds, possibly thousands of e-mails sent to this woman. details of where she fits into an increasingly tangled web of relationships. i'll talk about all of this with the chair of the senate intelligence committee. dianne feinstein says it is like something off the front page of a tab roid mloid magazine and s demanding answers. i'm wolf blitzer and you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with stunning twists in the scandal that brought down the head of the cia, general david petraeus. another u.s. general is caught in the same tangled web. john allen, top commander in afghanistan, is being investigated by the pentagon for allegedly sending inappropriate e-mails to a married woman, the same woman whose complaint of threatening e-mails from general petraeus' lover cracked the scandal wide open. barbara starr is trying to sort this out for us. it is rather complicated, what's the latest you're getting? >> it is still the same fundamental question for the last 24 hours, wolf. why is john allen being investigated and how on earth did he get caught up in this? marine corps general john allen denies an extramarital affair with jill kelly, the florida socialite whose concern over threatening e-mails led to an investigation that revealed an affair between cia director david petraeus and his biographer, paula broadwell. a pentagon official told reporters allen who commands the war in afghanistan is adamant he did nothing wrong. a senior official close to allen tells cnn of kelly there is no affair, she's a bored socialite. a u.s. official says there appears to be nothing criminal involved. but allen is now under investigation for what is called inappropriately flirtatious e-mails to kelly. >> secretary directed it be referred to inspector general of department of defense. >> the fbi found up to 35,000 pages of documents, some dating back two years during the investigation. according to a senior official close to allen, one message the afghan commander sent warned kelly she had been threatened. the official says allen had received an anonymous message, now believed to be from broadwell. the pentagon was called in because allen is subject to military law. but why did this only come out now in public view? >> we have a large amount of alleged material that went between these individuals, as much as 30,000 pages. it's not clear whether this was viewed as a relatively minor question or whether it was not apparent until the very end that the general was involved. >> allen was to appear thursday for senate hearing to become the military head of nato. now that is on hold. >> we need to be careful not to have this cloud of scandal start to color the image of general allen because the minute that happens, it may be almost too late to sustain his leadership. >> wolf, so everybody is talking about 30,000 pages of documents and e-mails. it sounds like an extraordinary number. but behind the scenes, officials are telling us be cautious. some of this may be copies, it may be blast e-mails to one of general allen's e-mail lists, some may be on his business computer, military computer, some may be on his private computer. we just don't know yet the full scope of all of this. so far, the white house is still expressing confidence in him as commander of the war in afghanistan, wolf. >> the war in afghanistan, but they put on hold at least for now his confirmation hearings to be the chief -- the head of nato if you will, supreme allied commander for europe. those confirmation hearings at least for now on hold and they're trying to accelerate the confirmation hearings of the general slated to take over for him in afghanistan. >> that's exactly right. allen was 48 hours away from thursday a hill hearing to become the new military chief of nato. the hearing for his successor to command the war in afghanistan will go on. now the question really is this. will general allen either have a problem here with further investigation, will he get cleared of this in time to perhaps still be able to effectively take over at nato. we don't know the answer yet. >> barbara starr, thank you. >>> another development, an fbi search at the woman at the center of the affair, paula broadwell. suzanne, you learned new details about the search. what have agents found? >> that's right, wolf. we know that fbi agents were at broadwell's home in charlotte, north carolina last night. agents spent about five hours conducting a search, took documents and computers from her house. we're told by a u.s. official that agents are looking further into what classified material she has. the official described this as much as sort of tying up loose ends really. an earlier search of broadwell's computer turned up classified material and according to the same official, broadwell and petraeus told investigators the material didn't come from him. you can bet those agents are trying to track down the source of that classified information, wolf. there's still no word whether there could be charges brought against her, but we're told she hired an attorney in washington, and i reached out several times to him today. haven't heard back yet. >> what do we know about the fbi agent that sent kelly shirtless pictures of himself? >> a u.s. official confirms the agent in question did send shirtless photos of himself to kelly, which opens up a host of questions. they also said that happened before this case ever began. we already know this was the agent kelly took her original concerns to when she received the e-mails she felt were threatening. an official we spoke with said this agent never worked the case, but passed on the information to special agents in another department, the cyber unit. it was that department that took up the investigation that eventually led to the affair between broadwell and general petraeus. >> this agent also who has not been identified, suzanne, who allegedly went to this republican member of congress from washington state, dave reichert, he then went to house minority leader, majority leader eric cantor who went to justice department and fbi and as a result, all of this exploded. by releasing sensitive information to this member of congress, did he break the law? is he under investigation now for potentially criminal activity, this fbi agent? >> i am sure now wolf they'll be looking at whistleblower laws to see if he was or not. once again, he wasn't actually in the chain f command, it wasn't one of the special agents investigating the case, but he did have details because of his relationship with jill kelly. that's where the scrutiny is to determine whether or not any laws were broken. >> we'll soon find out. suzanne, chief political analyst, gloria borger has been digging into this. doing some reporting on the e-mails. what are you finding out? >> what i'm learning, wolf, is these e-mails to jill kelly from paula broadwell were accusatory in nature, saying jill kelly had effectively behaved inappropriately with some generals at macdill air force base where she worked or helped, and according to one source who is familiar with the e-mails, they detailed what this source calls, i want to read this to you, the comings and going of the generals and miss kelly. now, generals is a plural there. maybe, wolf, it was a bunch of social events. what raised eyebrows for investigators was that paula broadwell whom they later discovered was sending these e-mails actually seemed to know the details of the general's schedule, including general petraeus's schedule, and much of that is not open to the public. that's when they started thinking if the sender of this e-mail has access to his private schedule, what else does this e-mailer have access to, and that raised all kinds of national security alarms. >> there's deep irritation on capitol hill, in the house and senate, respective intelligence committee chairs, for example, that they weren't notified about this, and that irritation seems to be escalating. >> yeah, it is escalating, and one of the reasons is, wolf, that the national security act itself, if you read it, as i have, and others have, and lawyers have, is very ambiguous on this question. it would have been a lot easier if the fbi discovered a national security breach. then the protocol is clear, you take it up the ladder. but if it is just a criminal investigation and it is closing and you don't think there's national security implications, there's a great deal of sensitivity for the fbi. they feel no matter what they do, they're going to get blamed. if they don't tell congress, they're going to hear this, that they should have been informed. and if they do tell congress, they risk the story getting out when perhaps it is a closed matter. i think another question a lot of people are raising is whether the fbi should have investigated this matter at all. were these harassing enough e-mails to warrant investigation or did it just happen because jill kelley happens to be friends with an fbi agent who put it in front of someone. >> and all of this is a huge nightmare for the president, at an awful time, has a major transition on national security, losing secretary of state, secretary of defense, the cia director, might lose the attorney general. he has a lot on his mind. last thing he needs to have to deal with two generals being investigated. >> the point of this from white house point of view, nobody can blame the president for any of this, and that in fact general petraeus was close to a consensus candidate as you get for a job, and he definitely was. but it does place the president in an odd position because he has all of these moving chess pieces. he has to figure out where they go quickly, he has to do a lot of personal vetting, a lot of political vetting, and i would argue a lot of team building as he gets this foreign policy team together for a second term, not to mention the fact he would rather be focusing now on the fiscal cliff. >> and he is having a news conference tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. eastern from the white house. he is going to be bombarded with questions on this. not exactly the way he wanted to start that news conference, i am sure. thanks very much, gloria. >> sure. >>> she's the florida woman described by one source as bored, a bored, rich socialite. now jill kelley is caught up in this widening scandal. i will ask the head of the intelligence committee, dianne feinstein what she knows about this woman. my interview with senator feinstein next. >> her name has come into question, let me put it that way. 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[ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, aluminum production in south africa, and the aerospace industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. washington. jack cafferty is following that in the cafferty file. jack? >> wolf, picture the united states in that convertible at the end of the movie "thelma and louise" as it goes to the cliff. a bit dramatic, but the fiscal cliff is fast approaching. if congress doesn't take action before the end of the year, which is entirely possible, we're going to go right over the edge. it is called a cliff for a reason. if nothing happens, massive taxes and spending decreases kick in. cuts to the pentagon and other domestic program, and as the clock ticks down, there seems to be little common ground between the democrats and republicans. democrats want to raise taxes. republicans want changes to entitlement programs and want to do away with automatic spending cuts. we have seen this movie before. house speaker boehner says 2013 should be the year he says we begin to solve our debt through tax and entitlement reform. don't hold your breath. for starters, there's not that much time left for this lame duck session of congress. after all, they have to get their thanksgiving and christmas vacations in, right? and the democrats might want to wait until january when they have a larger majority in the senate. then there's always the possibility that congress settles on a smaller deal, a temporary one. kick the can down the road again. but if nothing is done, taxes will go up for every single american, and we'll be looking square at another recession next year. none of this will be easy on americans' pocketbooks. that's the question. how will the fiscal cliff affect the way you handle your money. post a comment on my blog, or go to my post on "the situation room's" facebook page. >> love that analogy to thelma and louise. >>> and the growing scandal between two top generals and two married women. one powerful lawmaker describes it as something right out of a tabloid. joining us now from capitol hill, senator dianne feinstein of california. she's the chair of the senate intelligence committee. senator, thanks very much for joining us. >> you're welcome, wolf. >> we've spoken on many occasions. i am tempted to throw my hands in the air and simply ask you what is going on now. we're waking up every morning to these new revelations. i have been around washington a long time, you have as well. they're pretty shocking. give us your immediate gut. what is going on. >> my immediate gut is like this is the national enquirer. i mean, every day there is something new, and that really does not affect what we're doing, it may add to it somewhat, but what the intelligence committee will begin tomorrow is an inquiry into the benghazi episode. we will have mr. morell, mr. olson of the counter terrorism center as well as the number two of the fbi, sean joyce, and in that way we will be able to cover that. it is also my intention that this has not yet been announced to talk with general petraeus, director petraeus. this ties into his trip that he made just before all of this broke to some middle eastern countries, including libya. this afternoon, i will be meeting with the ranking member, our vice chairman, saxby chambliss. we will go over the plan, we will both meet with mr. morell, and we will proceed. >> mike morell is the acting director of the cia now. do you have indications from general petraeus, even though he has resigned, he will come forward and testify about the benghazi affair before your committee? >> well, i believe he will. i think he's a responsible person, and i believe he will come. and so we are going to try to set that up today because his view as someone who was actually there, this is according to mr. woodward who was actually in benghazi, who actually spoke to people who went through the incident, i think that's important for us to hear. >> he was there. so let's talk a little bit about i guess the only way to describe these scandals that are going on, there's a scandal involving general petraeus, now general allen, leader of the u.s. military in afghanistan, the nato commander there, he's involved apparently as well. what can you tell us about first of all general allen's role in what's going on right now? >> well, this is all news to me, too. in late spring of this year, the four corners of our two committees, house and senate, the leadership, met with general allen in kabul. we were very impressed with him. he gave a historic narrative of the area which was impressive. he talked about his mission, how it was going, and i think the four of us came away with a sense that he is, in fact, a fine commander. i don't know exactly what the situation is here. we will look at it, we will ask for a report, we will gather the materials, we will ask to see classified documents that may have been miss broadwell's computer. i spoke to the attorney general about that last night. he agreed to present this to the intelligence committee, so we will have those, which is important to our mission because our mission is to see was intelligence what it should have been. should we have known this was a terrorist attack, much quicker than ten days after the attack. and my answer is yes, absolutely. so we want to hear testimony on that. if we have had an intelligence deficit, one thing or another, our oversite responsibilities have us take actions to see that this area of the world is beefed up intelligence wise. this can't be allowed to happen again. >> have you been briefed on the nature of the relationship between general allen and this woman in tampa, jill kelley? apparently there were thousands of pages of documents that were e-mailed from general allen to this woman that we don't know much about. as chair of the intelligence committee, what have you been told? >> i have not been told very much, that's for sure, and i'll be asking a lot of questions. i know her name has come into question, let me put it that way. i have no factual information whatsoever. people have mentioned that to me in the course of a conversation. that's all. >> do you have any reason to believe classified information was sent from general allen to this woman, jill kelley? >> well, i'll tell you this, knowing a little bit about general allen, i would be doubtful it had been, just as i would be doubtful it had been from general petraeus, and essentially i believe it has been confirmed that no classified information was given by director petraeus to paula broadwell. i would expect to find the same thing with respect to general allen. i would be very shocked and surprised if that were the case. >> which raises the question, why did the fbi go back to paula broadwell's home yesterday, last night, spend five hours there, and take out box after box after box of documents, computer equipment, and other material. >> that would indicate to me they're still looking for something. i don't happen to know what that something is. >> do you have any reason to believe she still had security clearances? i know when she was active duty, she says publicly she had what's called not only top secret but sci secure come partment clearances. do you have any reason to believe she still had that? >> i do not. >> if she got classified information from general petraeus, that would be violation of the law i presume? >> i'm not going to go there because i don't know that to be the case. look, this is a man of substantial integrity and credibility and i think the last thing he would do would be that. >> why wasn't president obama informed of this sooner. that and more with my interview with dianne feinstein next. >>> before last friday, david petraeus was known mainly as an outstanding four star general who led u.s. troops in iraq and afghanistan. now he is a man who resigned after cheating on his wife, joining the ranks of many men that have fallen from grace. lisa sylvester is covering this for us. we have seen this many times. >> that's right. there are certain powerful traits they have, charisma, leadership skills, decisiveness, risk taking. experts say the same elements of their personality may also lead them astray. >> i did not have sexual relations with that woman. >> i have acted in a way that violates my obligations to my family and that violates my or any sense of right and wrong. >> you didn't send that photo to that woman in washington state? >> i did not send it to that woman. >> they have power, fame and have betrayed their families. men that marred their stellar careers and suffered the consequences. former general petraeus, head of the cia, is the latest to get caught, stepping down after admitting to an affair. but why in the world do men with so much to lose risk it all? helen fisher is author of the book "anatomy of mating. >> the men are high on testosterone, that triggers the sex drive. also away from home a lot, have a lot of opportunities, and a lot of women like a high ranking man. if they aren't looking for anyone, a lot of people are interested in somebody like them. >> in civilian life, an affair can cost your marriage or job. in the military, adulterers can be prosecuted. david petraeus insists it started only after he left the military, but his admission has been stunning. >> we have an expression in the military, if it feels good, don't do it. he failed that test in spades. it is a matter of narcissism, huberous, of access. >> military life can be hard on families when you mix in long separations and deployments. jc ekkhardt talks about it. >> if it can happen to this couple who was together for years, their entire adult life, it means that others might be susceptible. >> i don't know of a military couple who did not have the conversation this weekend that was please, please, please don't let this happen to us, promise me this won't happen to us, or this better not ever happen to us. >> petraeus is a lesson even those that climb to the very top can fall from grace. and among military families, the sentiment is just sadness that general petraeus built up this incredible reputation only to watch it all collapse in front of him, wolf. >> a tragedy. >> it is really sad. this is the thing many americans are going to remember him for, not for all of his good work that he did before this, wolf. >> very sad indeed. thanks, lisa, for that report. >>> we're also learning new information about the other top general caught up in this petraeus scandal. who he was trading e-mails with, what they were saying. much more coming up at the top of the hour. sn't hurt. and my daughter loves the santa. oh, ah sir. that is a customer. let's not tell mom. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. >>> here is a look at this hour's hot shots. in scotland, soldiers take part in a homecoming parade. in india, they light oil lamps. in somalia, a top official greets officers on a one day trip to the country. in the united states, a man stands in front of a poster for the new james bond movie, "skyfall." good movie. jack is back with the cafferty file. >> are you in that new bond movie? >> i am briefly. i do have a cameo role in a james bond movie, can you believe that? >> that's kind of cool, did you get to run around with any of the bond girls? >> i would like to, i don't think they would run around with me. i would like to. daniel craig, james bond, and wolf blitzer. >> that's not bad. i read where it grossed a bucket of money. apparently it is a hot film. check it out. >> i don't know about the bucket of money. >> having you there will enhance the take at the box office. >> i assume it will. >> millions of fans will line up to see you. >> yeah. >> the question this hour, how will the fiscal cliff affect the way you handle your money. bob writes i have been living on the cliff since the bush era in 2000. this step closer to the edge will go almost unnoticed. al writes what money. many americans haven't recovered from 2008, trying to replace lost savings. a more sympathetic question would have been how will the fiscal cliff affect your ability to replace the assets you lost in 2008? kenneth in california, won't affect my handling of my money. i am a working guy, always saved and bought with cash, except for the mortgage on the house. dave in florida writes won't affect me, i have no money left to handle, but i have an absolute faith in congress's ability to kick the can over the cliff, so bring it on. jim in illinois says whatever happens, i'll be sending more to our socialist government so they can redistribute to the slackers. steve says when one knows there's a cliff ahead, you begin pumping the brakes will before you near the edge. i started pumping the brakes on personal spendings months ago once i realized congress is more interested in their agenda than in the welfare and financial health of my country. if you want to read more, go to the blog, cnn.com/caffertyfile or through our post on "the situation room" facebook page. >> will do. >>> more information about john allen's relationship with that woman in tampa who sparked the investigation. i'm a conservative investor. i invest in what i know. i turned 65 last week. i'm getting married. planning a life. there are risks, sure. but, there's no reward without it. i want to be prepared for the long haul. i see a world bursting with opportunities. india, china, brazil, ishares, small-caps, large-caps, ishares. industrials. low cost. every dollar counts. ishares. income. dividends. bonds. i like bonds. ishares. commodities. diversification. choices. my own ideas. ishares. i want to use the same stuff the big guys use. ishares. 9 out of 10 large, professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. introducing the ishares core, etfs for the heart of your portfolio. tax efficient and low cost building blocks to help you keep more of what you earn. call your advisor. visit ishares.com. ishares. yeah, ishares. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. at meineke i have options... like oil changes starting at $19.95. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> and you're in "the situation room." happening now, a second distinguished military general now in a growing scandal that reads like a soap opera. just ahead, what we just learned about why he might have been involved. stand by. >>> and the woman who may have started it all with a complaint about threatening e-mails. just who is jill kelley? we're live outside her home, digging for more information. and the cia seemingly brought down by an affair between two consenting adults. what prompted the fbi to get involved in the first place? we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." the top u.s. commander in afghanistan, the second powerful military force to surface in a scandal that's taken down former cia director david petraeus. general john allen is being investigated for allegedly sending inappropriate messages to jill kelley, the woman behind the fbi investigation that uncovered the petraeus affair with his biographer, paula broadwell. cnn's joe johns learned from a source familiar with kelley's version of events there was no sexual relationship with general allen and that their communications were not of a sexual nature. our correspondent nick paton walsh is joining us from beirut. you spent a lot of time in afghanistan, got to know general allen. what have you heard over the past 24 hours let's say about this relationship, if in fact there was a relationship, with this woman, jill kelley in tampa? >> reporter: well, i have spoken to a senior official close to general john allen, and that man is absolutely explicit there was no affair, there was nothing of a sexual nature between them or romantic nature. they had never even been alone together. he refers to jill kelley as a bored socialite, who knew many of the commanders because of their role as honorary ambassador, working in programs to look after veterans when they return to the united states. absolutely clear that yes, e-mails were sent by her to both general john allen's business and personal account, but they were almost entirely innocuous nature, not even flirtatious language my source says. at some point, the general may have said thanks, sweetheart, but he is from virginia. that's how they will refer to someone else. she may have said you looked great on television. but it wasn't a flirtatious exchange. absolutely clear there's nothing of a sexual nature here. why are we in this situation, wolf, why are the fbi paying such close attention. this source says general john allen received an e-mail from this anonymous account, allegedly run by paula broadwell, warning him about jill kelley. now, he of course knowing jill kelley wrote to her to say look, i received this e-mail talking badly about you, threatening you in some ways, you should know about it. we don't know what happened then. it may be that's when she first contacted an fbi agent. it is not clear. that seems to be the source of the fbi interest in the e-mail exchanges. we talk about 20 to 30,000 documents. my source says that's an exaggeration. he says general john allen replies almost religiously to every e-mail he sent, could be why there's a volume of traffic here. above all, he is clear it is innocuous in content, not flirtatious language. that's giving you a rare glimpse of the other side of the fence. we haven't heard from general john allen, but that's a senior official close to him. >> the news you're reporting is that general allen received an anonymous e-mail, but later discovered it to be from paula broadwell, warning him stay away from this other woman, jill kelley. is that what i heard you say? >> reporter: that's correct, that's correct. that's of course when he notified jill kelley, and perhaps where this involvement in the fbi began. i am speculating purely here. that appears to be how the fbi got brought into this and how general john allen got dragged into the situation that led to the resignation of general david petraeus from the cia. >> you know general allen from your coverage of the war in afghanistan. give us a little sense of who this general is. >> reporter: a man greatly respected by many of those who work around him from my dealings with him. it is interesting, the man is supposed to be a salesman, pr master, selling you not just on the war but many fronts, when you talked to him, you were aware he had acute understanding of the problems. he wasn't glossing over the issues. he didn't know what needed to be changed there, but in many ways a man facing a difficult task. decisions about troop withdrawal, what to be done on the ground decided for him by washington, and simply trying to draw down a messy, decade long war. he was a man that inspired great loyalty from those around him. one aide i spoke to said he had done many tours in afghanistan, tours in iraq, didn't want to go to afghanistan, but would serve if general john allen asked him to. that call came through. he explained that loyalty came from one anecdote. he and general allen were sat at iraq in a dining facility, a round came near the building, shook it, a young soldier dived under the table for cover. john allen stayed calmly in the seat, stayed down, said son, you're not going to win the war from down there. that's a small taste of what one person explained a reason why they were inspired by him. i am sure why when the news broke this morning, it surprised people with close knowledge of john allen. wolf? >> nick paton walsh, thanks for that reporting. appreciate it. joining us to talk more about what's going on, former democratic congresswoman from california, jane harmon. thanks for coming in. >> thank you. >> let's talk about what's going on, you were a member of the house intelligence committee a long time. i interviewed dianne feinstein, she's not happy she learned about this from news media inquiries. listen to what she told me. >> and it is rather shocking to find out candidly that we weren't briefed and that we find out from the press in the way in which we did, with no heads up, with no opportunity to ask questions or put together any information. >> are you surprised and shocked as i was that the chair of the senate intelligence committee learns that general petraeus is being investigated when reporters start calling up her office? >> yes. there's a lot we don't know about the process here. let's start with something you said earlier, wolf, that private consensual sexual affairs should be off limits. i don't see that congress needs to know about those. i don't see that they need to take up this much time on the media frankly when there are important things going on around the world. but nonetheless -- >> he resigned though. >> the process here is confusing. yes, once he resigned, absolutely, the facts need to be known. >> it is not every day a cia director resigns in the midst of a sexual scandal. >> but rolling back the tape here, best as we can tell, this started as an investigation into cyber stalking, alleged cyber stalking by paula broadwell, and through that investigation by the fbi, which i assume was handled according to fbi rules, cyber stalking is a potential crime. the connection to petraeus was discovered. at that point if the fbi is investigating criminal activity, informing other people could blow their investigation, so i don't know at that point whether there was any obligation to disclose, and i think their position was there was not obligation to anyone. >> this fbi eight in tampa who alerted this congressman, end of october, who told eric cantor, who went to justice department of the fbi and then this thing exploded. >> again, i don't know exactly what happened, who went, who informed the fbi or asked -- >> you were a long time member of homeland security committee, house intelligence committee. did this fbi agent by blowing the whistle on whatever he did to the republican congressman from washington state, dave reichart do anything wrong? >> that's what we have to find out. dianne feinstein is right to be miffed. i think she and saxby chambliss will have closed door hearings and get all of the facts. that's one part of the fbi story we don't understand. why were they briefing jim clapper on election day, may have been coincidence, he is director of national intelligence. again, when did this investigation of potential cyber crime become something else, and if there were no national security implications, what were they doing telling clapper, then clapper volunteered to petraeus he should have stepped aside. >> it is pretty shocking to me, too, she said this, dianne feinstein, that she only learned david petraeus as cia director went to benghazi, and libya, only learned it from bob woodward from "the washington post.." >> that seems strange, i don't know what his obligation is to share travel plans with her unless she was asking for travel plans, she may have been asking and not receiving the information. i don't know that. but they work in separate branches of government. her job as overseer is an important job. i had the -- well, i was ranking member, she's chairman, i was ranking member on the house side a long time, and demanded to be briefed by the administration, but a couple of other points, full disclosure. >> you're a member of the external advisory board of the cia and worked closely with general petraeus over the years. >> just going there, yes. i worked closely with him, met him through my professional duties and we have a long, professional, and noi a social relationship. dave and holly petraeus are my friends. >> have you spoken to them since this? >> yes, i have spoken to him. i have very high regard for her. i hope we will all give them some personal space to deal with what is obviously a very difficult moment in their family. i also hope congress will exercise its appropriate responsibilities as the legislative branch, article one of the constitution to get all of the information, but i am guessing when we finally are through this whole thing that there may be less than meets the eye. >> should he have resigned? >> well, that's his call. he was advised to resign. >> is that appropriate for general clapper, director of national intelligence, to tell him to resign? >> i think you have to ask clapper that, but i think we need much more full information than at least i have to decide that. i just want to say while we're talking about this, hard working, outstanding people at the cia and at dod, talking about the general allen issue are hard at work for keeping our country safe and the message needs to go out to them that the government stands behind them, that to the extent there are any transitions, they will be orderly. they're solid, serious appropriate successors to david petraeus being considered. >> as soon as he resigned friday your name came up as potentially cia director. never been a woman head of the cia. is that something you would be interested in? >> i have a terrific job. i served in congress 17 years. >> would you be interested in being cia director? >> it is flattering to be considered. my prediction is that one of the inside people, either mike morell. >> acting director. >> acting director and is excellent, or john brennan also rumored to be under consideration will probably be asked and either of them would do an excellent, excellent job. there needs to be stability. one final point about david petraeus's performance as cia director. that's something i know about. >> 14 months director as cia. >> director in afghanistan and before that as centcom commander. he brought a different style to the cia than leon panetta. he was hard at work, bringing enormous strategic sense to understanding dangerous parts of the world. the cia is a big, positive contributor to the intelligence community which operates a lot better since we reformed it in 2004 and created a joint command across 16 agencies. the cia is indispensable in the effort to prevent terror attacks on our country. >> you once said, quoting you, i live and breathe security 24/7, if they come and ask you to be director of the cia, you will have that opportunity to live and breathe security 24/7. >> i live and breathe at the wilson center, and as the external board if his successor keeps me on. i think it is a critical time for our country. we need to talk about organizing the opposition in syria which if it happens will be a great contribution of secretary of state hillary clinton. >> we will have opportunities to talk about syria and other issues down the road. thanks for coming in. >>> did the fbi end up investigating something that amounted to nothing? up next why some suggest general david petraeus' downfall wasn't deserved. >>> and we look at recent scandals plaguing the u.s. military's highest ranks. 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go to cnn.com/caffertyfile, post a comment on my blog. or go to our post on "the situation room's" facebook page. time for a gop makeover. >> lot of people saying it, including top republicans. >>> growing questions about whether the downfall of general david petraeus was justified as we learn more about the investigation from the fbi that uncovered his affair. let's bring in brian todd working this part of the story. you're getting new information, brian. >> wolf, we are. you look at it overall, the scandal spread from one on one harassment to top levels of government with two prominent officials involved. it is now leading to serious questions about why it was pursued so thoroughly, and whether it should have been. the affair was between two consenting adults, so far no criminal wrongdoing has been found. no breach of national security. paula broadwell's e-mails to jill kelley were angry, jealous in tone, according to sources, but did not threaten violence. now a cia director has been brought down and a top general is being investigated and many of asking did something amounting to maybe nothing spark an fbi investigation? >> a lot of people don't understand and are shocked to believe if they send something on the internet to something they don't like, maybe the e-mail is investigated. >> questions are being raised about the motives of the fbi agent involved. the first one approached about e-mails had previously sent shirtless photos to kelley, according to a u.s. official that said that agent was never part of the case. still, "the new york times" says the agent nosed around the case until his superiors told him to stay away. >> obviously the fact he keeps asking about it indicates to other agents he shouldn't be asking this, it is none of his business really to know what another squad is doing. >> how unusual is that behavior inside the bureau? >> it would depend. >> how frowned upon is it? >> normally most agents would understand it is inappropriate. >> cnn contributor tom fuentes says the agent's conduct likely wouldn't have affected the probe. what would have pushed the investigation this far? others say content of e-mails. they detail coming and goings of the generals. parts of his schedule were not public. former cyber crime prosecutor says it would raise two questions for the fbi. >> one would be the concern that one has more access to information that person shouldn't see or look at. the second is a security concern. >> that security concern he said would be the possible targeting of petraeus or top generals that could have been mentioned in e-mails from broadwell. if she puts that information about schedules into e-mails to kelley and that gets circulated further, the generals could be at personal risk. willinger says that's enough for the fbi to take it further. the fbi hasn't commented furtherer. an official says it was appropriate to investigate. >> does the fbi routinely investigate these harassing e-mails? >> the fbi is devoting more time these days to investigating cyber harassment cases, cyber stalking cases. he says they don't go after one on one cases that are less threatening, mildly threatening, which this appears to be. he says clearly there's something more here. he believes information about comings and goings that paula broadwell sent sparked the investigation and he said there were grounds to do that. >> brian, thanks very much. >>> if a top general has an affair, is it a crime under military law? the answer might be yes. is it time for a refresh you er course from the top down? more in the "the situation room." ♪ [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. 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[ female announcer ] root touch-up by nice'n easy has the most shade choices, designed to match even salon color in just 10 minutes. with root touch-up, all they see is you. >>> lisa sylvester is monitoring other top stories in "the situation room" now. the governor of alabama making a significant statement as far as health care coverage in his state is concerned. >> that's right, wolf. robert bentley says the state will opt out of the state insurance exchange under the affordable health care act commonly called obama care. the governor says alabama will not expand state medicaid programs because the state can't afford it. states have until this friday to announce if they will participate in an exchange program. >>> and democratic congressman jesse jackson junior is out of mayo clinic where he was treated for bipolar depression, despite embroiled in a house ethics investigation for misuse of campaign funds. he won re-election last week, he has been on leave of absence since june. >>> and john mcafee says he is innocent of murder and is on the run from authorities in central america. he is wanted in belize for questioning after his neighbor, a u.s. citizen, was found shot to death last weekend. mcafee left his namesake internet security firm in 1994. >>> and massachusetts police say an er doctor driving drunk and on pills caused this unbelievable crash. it wasn't even 9:00 in the morning when police say the woman behind the wheel hit a delivery truck in a parking lot, ran into a fence twice, sheered a post in two, and then went airborne, crashing into street traffic. one person was transported to the hospital with injuries and the driver was arrested at the scene. police say she failed two sobriety tests, and prosecutors say this doctor is actually prescribing drugs to herself. lucky we didn't have more injuries when you look at the incredible video, wolf. >> 9:00 in the morning. >> wasn't even quite 9:00 in the morning when that happened, wolf. >> thank you. >>> a top u.s. general comes under fire not for an affair, inappropriate e-mail, but rather his wife's shopping sprees. the military scandal problem, that's next. on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. 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[ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. >>> the senate intelligence committee just wrapped up closed door meetings on what to do next as far as general petraeus is concerned, what to do next as far as the benghazi investigation is concerned. our senior congressional correspondent dana bash has been speaking with some members and joins us now. what are you learning? >> senator dianne feinstein, chairman of the intelligence committee told you earlier in the show, wolf, she wants former director david petraeus to come and talk to the intelligence committee about what he knows about what happened in benghazi, and there was a meeting just behind me of all the members of the intelligence committee, and feinstein came out and told me that they all did decide that is appropriate, that it is appropriate for petraeus to come and talk to them. we heard from the white house earlier today that they believe that what the current or acting director of the cia knows about benghazi is good enough, and that they don't necessarily need to hear from petraeus. clearly on a bipartisan level, the senators here disagree. feinstein told me she believes that there is a big stone left unturned if they don't talk to petraeus. when is that going to happen? earlier today she told me it would happen as early as friday. just now she said they have to wait to talk to him first about when he can come, but they're hoping it will be soon. that is the news here. one other thing that's interesting that there's a lot of anger on capitol hill that members of the intelligence committee at least what they call the big four, chair and ranking members of the house and senate intelligence committee weren't briefed at all about this investigation of david petraeus as it was going on. saxby chambliss, top republican, told ted barrett they are getting a briefing from number two at the fbi about why that didn't happen. we expect something similar on the house side tomorrow. >> they take oversite responsibilities seriously. dana, thanks for that. >>> days after general david petraeus stepped down as the cia director, the investigation that uncovered his affair put a cloud over another four star general, john allen. petraeus and allen, two top military men, caught in a drama fresh out of a soap opera. let's go right to the pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. chris, is this kind of thing an isolated problem, is there a widespread issue growing in the military? what's going on? >> it is a great question, wolf. you don't hire a flag officer to kick down doors and shoot down bad guys. they're given the highest pay and the best perks for their judgment, and for a growing number of them, that judgment has been flawed. they are the elite few, the generals and admirals that rose to the highest ranks of the military. >> i will do my utmost to serve. >> but the shine is off the stars, and it goes beyond retired general david petraeus. >> i could think of no better role, no more noble task. >> the defense secretary just demoted four star general kip ward and ordered him to repay over $80,000. investigators found he used his rank to shuttle his wife on shopping sprees, enjoyed a lavish beach front trip, and once accepted a defense contractor's gift of going back stage to meet denzel washington. >> we going to roll it. >> what do you mean? >> got to do something to stop the dive. >> another court-martialed for sodomy. when he was called out for his attitude towards women, he allegedly said i'm a general, i'll do whatever the [bleep] i want. words in rolling stone cost him his job in 2010. >> the problem is that there's a cascade of these right now. >> retired general spider mark says as an officer moves through the ranks, there are mechanisms in place that reinforce the military's values, but at the top, a lot of checks and balances have fallen by the wayside, isolating the flag officer. >> it is a thing called hub russ. at some point you think the rules don't apply to you. >> that sense of entitlement sets a dangerous precedent for younger troops. >> if we have a military that doesn't have a firm basis in understanding how important moral, ethical behavior and decision making are to their daily actions and in terms of leadership, then that's -- that kind of puts everything in question. >> these are truly aberrations. >> despite lapses of judgment, he believes military culture is still sound. >> look at the hundreds, thousands of senior officers at multiple levels that served with incredible dignity. >> without a doubt, that's true. there are 1.4 million troops, but flag officers? fewer than 950. so generals and admirals make up the tiniest of tiny fraction of the military. when you see five, six, seven showing bad judgment, that's a larger percentage than you might initially think, wolf. >> chris lawrence, thanks very much. let's dig deeper with our national security contributor fran town send, former bush homeland security adviser, and member of the cia external advisory committee. what are these military leaders doing wrong here? what's going on from your vantage point, fran? >> wolf, i think we have to make real distinctions between an officer facing charges of sodomy and whether it is flirtatious e-mails or extramarital affairs, i am not excusing that bad behavior, but as you appreciate, there are serious qualitative differences here. i think chris is right to say i think the military needs to do is step back for a moment and look at the kinds of sort of problems in terms of judgment calls that some of these officers have faced, whether it is sexual impropriety or financial impropriety or crimes, that is violations of the code of military justice. and you have to ask yourself, if there's a policy in corporate america that's important, you have to get retrained on it every year. lawyers have to take every two years in new york state, they have to take professional responsibility courses, spend hours being retrained. and frankly, if i was general marty dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs, right now, i am sort of surprised he hasn't stepped out about this. part of that is because these cases, some of these cases are under review right now, but you have to say to yourself we need to then reinforce military ethics and our code of conduct if we want it to be taken serious at the highest levels, we need to make sure they're touching that code f conduct and being spoken to about it on a regular, if not annual basis. i suspect you will see the chairman and vice chairman speak to the combatant commanders about it straight down through the ranks. >> the role of commander in chief, the president of the united states should be? >> every year the president has a conference where he pulls together the commanders and senior military leaders and i'm quite sure, wolf, when they sit down, usually there's a dinner, then they spend a half day together at least. i expect on the agenda this year, the president, commander in chief, will be talking about the importance of the military code of conduct and their ethical behavior. >> do you think the worst of this petraeus scandal is now known or is there more still coming out? >> you know, wolf, the thing, gosh knows i hope and wish it would be over. i think the piece about the petraeus broadwell affair is done. i think we should wait to make too much out of the john allen, there may be inappropriate or flirtatious e-mails. people again say there was not an affair there, but i think the thing we don't understand, the fact is the fbi has said there's not going to be criminal charges against broadwell or petraeus, except they conducted a six hour search, brought out reams of documents. there's a reason for that, and we don't know what that is. we don't really understand the full import of jill kelley and her many relationships, we have to assume it is not just with david petraeus and john allen, she had access to all sorts of senior military, and i suspect they're looking at whether or not she was just sort of a bored socialite as general allen's spokesperson suggested or whether she was being sort of directed by a foreign intelligence service. >> which is a serious allegation obviously. >> absolutely. >> one final question. quickly if you could give me a good answer, this fbi agent that supposedly leaked this to that republican congressman from washington state to congressman dave reichart, did he do anything wrong, violate fbi rules or laws out there? >> wolf, there's a process in the fbi to raise those concerns. we don't know whether or not he did that, but if he failed to raise it internally and simply went directly, he may have violated certainly internal policy of the fbi, and it remains to be seen whether or not there's a legal problem there. >> fran, thanks very much. >> thanks, wolf. >> more on this woman, behind the investigation that brought down david petraeus. who exactly is jill kelley. up next, a live report from right outside her home in tampa. >>> this is new video we're just getting in of jill kelley leaving her home in tampa. she's the woman whose complaints about threatening e-mails may have brought the wheels of this scandal to light. cnn's ed will he have and dar a is outside her home. ed, what are you learning? >> reporter: wolf, it is a confusing picture at this point. we're doing the best we can to sift through the various pieces we have been able to put together about jill kelley, the woman that's front and center at the scandal surrounding general petraeus, but we do know jill kelley lived here in tampa for awhile. she's married to a prominent doctor in the area. as one defense department official described her, in a not so flattering way, described her as a bored rich socialite, but she had become heavily involved here with military causes and hosting events. she also had been volunteering in the last six months we're told with a group called the national council for international visitors. a group that works with the state department. obviously with the dignitaries and high level officials that come through military bases in the tampa area, they had hosted events here at their home that you see behind me. but for her part, jill kelley isn't saying anything at all, simply that her and her husband have been friends with general petraeus the last five years and asking people to respect their privacy at this point. >> there's an interesting nugget here also, ed. it seems like both generals allen and petraeus reached out to help a legal case regarding jill kelley's twin sister, natalie. what do you know about this? >> reporter: this is interesting, i think it points to the types of relationships that jill kelley and her husband developed here, not just service relationships but obviously very intimate or close bonds with some of these people, they felt good enough to go to these two generals. it was jill kelley's sister we understand going through a custody battle with her ex-husband and that the two generals wrote letters on jill kelley's sister's behalf, describing her as a wonderful mother and trying to renegotiate or reframe some of the custody issues that were going on in that particular situation. but it is interesting these two generals would essentially go to bat for jill kelley's sister in this custody battle. >> also hearing, ed, from members of jill kelley's family. what's going on here? >> reporter: you know, jill kelley as we mentioned isn't saying anything. she hired a prominent d.c. attorney to help her house as well as a prominent d.c. public relations firm to help her through this. her brother did speak out. a lot of things had been said about her the last couple days, unflattering, especially her connections to general john allen, commanding officer in afghanistan as well. but her brother came out and spoke to one of the cnn affiliates in pennsylvania saying anything describing her as anything other than a good mother is simply wrong. >> if you know my sister the way i do, she is number one, a mother. she has three little kids. she is number two, a wife, okay? so after that, everything else is just a side attraction basically, it is peripheral. so she's very dedicated to her husband, to her kids. something like this is really pretty much a fluke, you know. so for anybody to paint her other than that is completely wrong, just completely wrong. >> reporter: wolf, as we mention, we're outside jill kelley's home. as amazing as it might seem, she seems to be going on with everything in her life. she showed up with her children and walked inside with all of the cameras looking at her, trying to get some sort of comment from her. wolf? >> interesting stuff. the prominent d.c. attorney representing her, abby lowell? >> reporter: yes. >> well known to represent high profile cases over the years. thank you. >>> the home of the petraeus mistress paula broadwell was searched for hours. just ahead next hour, new information about what fbi agents have found. comes with some risk,elot north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing generations of cleaner-burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self-contained well systems. and, using state-of-the-art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. 100% new. ♪ 100% greek. 100% mmm... ♪ oh wow, that is mmm... ♪ in fact it's so mmm you might not believe it's a hundred calories. well ok then, new yoplait greek 100. it is so good. ♪ which house is yours? 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[ male announcer ] the chevy silverado. the most dependable, longest-lasting full-size pickups on the road. from worksite to home front. chevy runs deep. >>> jack's back with the cafferty file. jack? >> question this hour, wolf, is what does the republican party have to do to become more relevant? may not be as dire as we make it out to be. mitt romney did get over 50 million votes. still, lee in wyoming writes, "the party of no is too narrow. it will go the way of the dinosaurs if it can't accept change in our very diverse country. the tea party is holding the republican party to hard-headed, no-promise ideas." bob in florida writes, "honestly, jack, i don't think the republicans have to change anything. over the next four years, we'll see obama care fully implemented, gas over 5 bucks a gallon, over $20 trillion in debt, gdp growth under 2%, one out of every four in poverty and still no jobs. republicans will run around with their don't blame me, i voted for romney bumper stickers, saying i told you so. elections really do have consequences." debby writes, "i've been a lifelong republican, but the party left me. they have moved so far to the right, i can't support them. the republican party is only concerned with the 1% and they're upset that all the big moneybags couldn't buy this election. the republican party failed its people and they wonder why the people won't support them." paul writes, "the last 60 years, there's been enormous change in the united states, in culture, race, and gender relationships. if the republicans want to become a more relevant elephant, they'll have to wake up to the fact that it's not 1952 anymore." jerry on facebook wrote this, "do what the democrats did after the disastrous 1980s, have a more moderate party platform. the republican platform is frightening." frank in los angeles writes, "the problem with the republican party is that they can't purchase relevance off the shelf or at high-end stores. thus, they're reaching tout to women and minorities as just plane tokenism. it's going to take years to wash away the bad taste left in the nation's mouth by republicans like alan west, todd akin, richard mourdock, and dick cheney." to read more about this, go to the blog, cnn.com/caffertyfile or through our post on "the situation room's" facebook page. wolf? >> jack, thank you. >>> he died back in 2004, but questions still linger over what exactly happened to yasser arafat. details on what investigators are doing right now to answer that question. was he poisoned? ♪ ♪ and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?! we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, and we do everything we can to be there for them when they need us. [car alarm blaring] call now and also ask about our 24/7 support and service. call... and lock in your rate for 12 months today. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> delicate work is now underway in the west bank to review the body of yasser arafat. french authorities have launched a murder investigation into his death after finding a radio active substance on some of his personal things. cnn's senior international correspondent sara sidner is in ramallah. >> reporter: security forces are keeping us as far away as possible from the palestinian presidential compound, where the body of deceased peo leader yasser arafat has been laid to rest. now, you can see below and behind me, a huge blue tarpaulin that is surrounding his mausoleum. what we're hearing from a source is the glass that usually surrounds that mausoleum has now been taken down and workers are working on removing the marble tombstone. this is all happening because the family of yasser arafat believes he was murdered after plunium 210 was found on his body, according to a swiss lab. his body is supposed to be exhumed this month and there is a lot of work to be done. a source says the exhumation could take at least two weeks and maybe more because some of the work will be done by hand. when the work of removing the dirt in his grave is done, we're expecting to see scientists from france, switzerland, and russia here to watch that process and to take tests. this is all happening just as everyone commemorates the advisory, the eight-year anniversary of arafat's death. his family very upset and there has always been suspicion that arafat was murdered when he died in a french hospital in 2004. sara sidner, cnn, ramallah. >>> happening now. spreading scandal. new claims about general john allen's contacts with the woman who helped trigger the david petraeus investigation. also, another surprising new twist leads back to petraeus' former lover, paula broadwell and her e-mail trail. >>> and the president's staffing up for his second term. he appears blindsided by this sensational mess. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the top u.s. military commander in afghanistan appears to be fighting back, trying not to be brought down by scandal, as general david petraeus was. general john allen is under investigation by the defense department, and his nomination to be the military head of nato is now on hold. at issue, allen's contacts with jill kelly, who played a role in exposing the affair that cost petraeus his job as the cia director. let's go to our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr. she's working the story for us. we're hearing general allen's side of the story right now, aren't we, barbara? >> we are, indeed, wolf. general allen, joe kelly all now saying what did not happen, but the question remains, why is there a pentagon investigation? marine corps general john allen denies an extramarital affair with jill kelly, the florida socialite whose concern over threatening e-mails led to an investigation that revealed an affair between cia director david petraeus and his biographer, paula broadwell. a pentagon official told reporters allen, who commands the war in afghanistan, is adamant he did nothing wrong. a senior official close to allen tells cnn of kelly, "there is no affair. she's a bored, rich socialite." a u.s. official says there appears to be nothing criminal, but allen is now under investigation for what is being called inappropriately flirtatious e-mails to kelly. >> directed that the matter be referred to the inspector general of the department of defense. >> reporter: the fbi found up to 30,000 pages of documents, some of them e-mails between allen and kelly, some dating back two years, during their investigation. according to a senior official close to allen, one message the afghan commander sent warned kelly she'd been threatened. the official says allen had received an anonymous message, now believed to be from broadwell. the pentagon was called in because allen is subject to military law, but why did this only come out now in public view? >> we have a large amount of alleged material that went between these individuals, as much as 30,000 pages. it's not clear whether this was viewed as a relatively minor question or whether it was not apparent, until the very end, that the general was involved. >> reporter: allen was to appear thursday for a senate hearing, to become the military head of nato. now, that is on hold. >> we need to be careful not to have this cloud of scandal start to color the image of general allen, because the minute that happens, it may be almost too late to sustain his leadership. >> reporter: the general is highly respected inside the ranks and is known to be all business. >> the president was very clear at west point. >> reporter: former marine, john eliot, has worked for allen. >> from early on in his career, all the way up to four stars and commanding afghanistan, he is somebody who has never made a wrong step. >> reporter: the president for now is keeping allen in command. >> he has faith in general allen, believes he's doing and has done an excellent job. >> look, wolf. a source familiar with jill kelly's version of events says there was no sexual relationship, there was no affair with general allen. but on the other side of this, there is an investigation here at the pentagon, and we have talked to senior officials who say leon panetta, the secretary of defense, would not have ordered that investigation if there wasn't something that needed to be looked at. wolf? >> so his nomination to be the nato supreme ally commander, following his tour of duty in afghanistan, all of that is on hold for now? >> reporter: it is on hold for now. there will be a confirmation hearing shortly for the man who is going to secede him to command the war in afghanistan. but right now, no clear way ahead for a new military chief of nato, the united states' most important security alliance, wolf. >> certainly is. barbara, thank you. let's get some more now on jill kelly and her connection to general allen and to the petraeus investigation. kate balduan is here picking up this part of the story. >> and as you know, our whole team, all of our correspondents are digging on this story for every bit of information as it's coming out, it seems in drips and drabs. our chief political analyst, gloria borger, is here with more on that. gloria, you're learning some new information this morning. what do you have? >> to follow up on what barbara starr is saying, my colleague, joe johns and i have been told that jill kelly and general allen had no sexual relationship. this is from a source familiar with jill kelly's version of events. but again, no sexual relationship. i don't think we know the exact nature of their friendship, but this is what we were told. i've also been told by a source familiar with jill kelly's version of events that she first mentioned this sort of e-mail harassment kind of casually to this fbi agent and said, i was told, you know, by the way, i'm getting these kinds of threatening e-mails and this agent then said, okay, let me check it out. and i'm told she was sort of happy for that. you know, okay, because this is kind of bothering me. i was also told from this same source, then, as we now know, the fbi agent went and proceeded. and that kelly did not know at first, or have any idea, that these -- that the e-mail investigation would eventually lead to the revelation of a relationship between petraeus and paula broadwell. so, again, when you look at how this kind of, this spool of yarn sort of unraveled, it's clear that jill kelly, at the outset, had no idea that this would damage her friend, david petraeus. >> because it came from an anonymous e-mail address. so she didn't even know where these threats were coming from. >> but the whole fbi investigation now has become so controversial. >> it's controversial at every level. and dana bash is going to talk about how it's controversial at the congressional level, because they wanted to be informed. but also, when you look at, again, how this story has snowballed, you start out with one woman e-mailing another woman. maybe she's jealous, whatever. and suddenly it involves the director of the cia, personal e-mails back and forth on g-mail accounts. and so you have civil libertarians now raising the question, wait a minute, what's appropriate to look into and what's inappropriate to look into? once you've discovered that there is no national security issue here, why are we looking into the personal e-mails between individuals when it has nothing to do with their, you know, with their professional jobs or, and that's an issue, in particular, if it involves general allen, for example, and jill kelley, who had no sexual relationship, as we've been told. so it's going to be a question that civil libertarians are going to be looking into, because in the age in which we live, this cyber age in which we live, this is kind of their worst nightmare. >> once you type it, even if you don't hit send, if you keep it in a draft file, it is there forever. >> there forever. gloria, thanks very much. >>> first, this scandal is obviously a big deal for a lot of reasons. it's certainly a huge deal for the obama administration. we have new details about when and how the president was told about the allen bombshell. and the latest development, our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin is joining us now. jessica, first of all, what are you learning? >> hi, wolf. we understand that the president was first told there might be trouble with general allen and this investigation on friday, when the white house's counsel office was notified that there could be trouble with his nomination to become nato supreme allied commander. then on monday evening, the president was notified that secretary of defense leon panetta has referred to matter to the defense department's inspector general. keep in mind, now, according to the timetable, the president had also just been told on thursday about general petraeus' indiscretions, so it must have been an awful lot to take in all in one week, right after the election. secretary -- press secretary jay carney says, though, it was out of the white house's hands, this time frame, for their notification. listen to this. >> they have, as i understand it, protocols in place for when they notify the legislative and executive branches of investigations. and it is simply a fact that the white house was not aware of the situation regarding general petraeus until wednesday, and the situation regarding general allen until friday. >> reporter: so as you consider the coincidence that the president was told about this just days after the election, keep this in mind. cnn has been told by senior u.s. officials that paula broadwell's last interview with the fbi was on november 2nd. so it would seem the fbi investigation was still ongoing just days before the election, wolf. >> the election was november 6th. this obviously leaves some huge holes in the president's national security team. what do we know about this cabinet shuffle that's about to begin? >> reporter: well, as we talk about personnel matters, let me say, the saying inside the obama administration is, "those who know don't talk and those who talk don't know." so, keeping that in mind, those who talk to me say the following. that u.s. ambassador susan rice has supporters inside the white house to become secretary of state. if she were to go for that job, if she were to be nominated, obviously, she would have a bruising confirmation battle, but people believe she would ultimately get confirmed. do they want that fight is a question and how would that affect the rest of the chess pieces? senator john kerry, who chairs the senate foreign relations committee, has, it's been widely known, long wanted to be secretary of state. if susan rice gets the state nomination, he could be put up for secretary of defense. or not. he says he's right now focused on his job in the senate. another possibility is the president has said he would lake to have a bipartisan cabinet. defense is a good place to put a republican, a republican such as former senator chuck hagel, for example. that's just one name i've heard bandied about. or you could put that person at cia. although the talk is that john brennan, the current homeland security adviser, is the man who could get cia if he wants it. but there's no knowledge about whether or not he wants it. and if he doesn't take it, mike morrell, the current acting director is considered the shoo-in for that job, wolf. >> he's got a full treasury secretary as well. there's speculation that jack lew could get that position. jessica, there'll be a lot of shuffling going on over at the white house. thanks very much. >> thanks, wolf. >>> the david petraeus scandal is complicating attempts by congress to investigate the attack on the u.s. consulate in bengha benghazi, libya. we'll tell you what's going on in a closed-door meeting on capitol hill, next. come on frank how long have we known each other? 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[ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans don't have enough to eat. anything else? no, not today. join me, aarp, and aarp foundation in the drive to end hunger by visiting drivetoendhunger.org. >>> members of congress are launching investigations into the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. the senate intelligence committee chair diane finestein says she hopes that petraeus will appear before her committee. stand by for some of that interview. that's coming up this hour. right now, i want to go to our senior congressional correspondent, dana bash. senator feinstein was in closed-door meetings this afternoon up on capitol hill. first of all, what are you hearing? what happened? >> reporter: she came out of those meetings saying she's not the only one who really believes it is still essential for now the former director of the cia, david petraeus, to come and talk to the senate intelligence committee about what he knows, about what went on in benghazi. she said that it was -- the committee was in full agreement. democrats and republicans, that they really want to hear from them. now, earlier in the day, she had said that she hopes that that would happen on friday. that he would come and talk to people in closed session this week, the end of the week, but after the meeting, she said that she's just not sure, because they actually have to get to david petraeus to see what would work with his schedule. the only other interesting thing about this meeting is that the republican who is the head of the intelligence committee, saxby chambliss, told our ted barrett that it's really important to emphasize what they want to talk to him about is the substance of benghazi. that he was there pretty recently. that he is an important player in terms of knowing what went on, and that that is the substance and the subject they want to talk to him about, reading between the lines, that they don't necessarily want to ask him about those e-mails. >> and senator john mccain was at that meeting as well. he's the ranking member of the armed service committee. what did they have to say? >> reporter: very interesting. until last night, the folks up here were thinking they had to focus on one scandal, and now it's of course two, with very big players. and the other has to do with the pentagon. and john mccain is the ranking republican on the armed services committee. i asked about how they're going to go forward with their investigation of general allen's alleged flirtatious e-mails with a woman. watch this. >> and i just was very surprised and the secretary of defense called me up and said that they were going to have a full investigation, that general allen denies any impropriety, so i think it's appropriate to have the investigation go forward and the senate armed forces committee look at it as well. >> are you comfortable with him serving in his current capacity? >> yes. i am -- i am comfortable with that. we need someone in charge. no one has ever argued that his performance of duty is not been excellent. but we are going forward with the hearing for his replacement, as you know. and that hearing, i'm sure will be resolved, this issue of succession. >> and again, that was senator mccain talking about the, now the scandal they're dealing with senator allen. making clear that although he believes his nomination for effectively a promotion is on hold, but that he's comfortable with him serving currently as the head of international forces in afghanistan. one last thing. senator mccain simply will not let up on this idea that the white house completely botched, in his words, the whole benghazi affair. but also -- twice used the terms "cover-up," that perhaps they're actually covering up some problems. he said it's either incompetence or cover-up. he says there's got to be a select committee on that. and although scandal has certainly taken over capitol hill in washington, he says that's the most important thing that congress should focus on. >> scandal, cover-up, botched, incompetence, whatever you want to call it, it's a bad situation, all-around. dana, thanks very much. >>> and you can really feel dianne feinstein's frustration when she talks about the david petraeus sex scandal and the new link to general john allen. stand by to hear the senate intelligence committee chair tell us the part she finds most shocking. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. but lately she's been coming in with less gray than usual. what's she up to? [ female announcer ] root touch-up by nice'n easy has the most shade choices, designed to match even salon color in just 10 minutes. with root touch-up, all they see is you. designed to match even salon color in just 10 minutes. i've been a superintendent for 30 some years at many different park service units across the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. >>> syria's government is scoffing at the new opposition alliance. kate's here with more on the day's top stories. >> a big story that we also continue to follow. also, the rebel alans says the only option for syria is a new government without president baa shir al assad. but they're saying no power in this entire world can defeat the regime. well, the u.s. and arab nations say the alliance needs to get on the same page with a plan to oust assad. the civil war rages on with at least 48 people killed in the violence today, day after day. >>> also, despite a botched launch this year, north korea has carried out two rocket engine tests since april. that's according to images from a commercial satellite that were analyzed by a u.s. academic website. the site, called 38 north, says after presidential elections in both the u.s. and south korea, the north may test its long-range missile and nuclear capabilities early next year. >>> and back in the u.s., two weeks after superstorm sandy harmed the northeast, new york city took another step toward normalcy. governor andrew cuomo announced the reopening of a key rush hour tunnel between brooklyn and lower manhattan, and he vows that's just for starters. >> and this is not just going to be about building back what was. this is not going to be just about restoring what was. this is going to be building back a new york that has never been before. and we're going to build back better than was before. >> the tunnel, formerly the brooklyn battery tunnel, was flooded with an estimated 43 million gallons of corrosive seawater in each of its two tubes. >>> and more travelers, but fewer fliers. that's the aaa thanksgiving forecast. says 43.6 million people will travel at least 50 miles from home, over the holiday, up a few thousand from last year, and the forecast says 90% of them will travel by car. the number of people flying is expected to drop slightly, although it will still top 3 million. possibly because of ticket prices. i booked a flight, whoo, that was painful. >> yeah. >> get used to it. >> yeah, no kidding. >> our correspondents are digging and digging and they're trying to find out what fbi agents may have discovered inside the home of david petraeus' lover. they're getting new information. here's another question we're asking. were any classified documents found? we're going to have the latest. consider the silverado 1500 -- still the most dependable, longest-lasting full-size pickups on the road. and now we've also been recognized for lowest total cost of ownership -- based on important things, like depreciation, fuel, and maintenance costs. silverado -- recognized for lowest total cost of ownership of any full-size pickup. from outstanding value to standing the test of time, chevy runs deep. it's the cleanest, clearest water. we find the best, sweetest crab for red lobster that we can find. 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[ forsythe ] if i wouldn't put it on my table at home, i wouldn't bring it in. my name's jon forsythe, and i sea food differently. >>> right now you may need a scorecard to keep track of the scandal that's hanging over the u.s. intelligence community, the u.s. military, and the obama administration. >> it all unraveled when david petraeus resigned as cia director last week, admitting he had an extramarital affair. the woman was later identified as his biographer, paula broadwell. the fbi investigated the affair after broadwell reportedly sent harassing e-mails to a tampa socialite, jill kelly. now, general allen is under investigation for his contacts with kelly. both he and kelly deny they ever had an affair. for more on all of this, that's really a hard web to even follow, let's bring in our intelligence correspondent, suzanne kelly. su
ABC
Nov 13, 2012 4:00am EST
petraeus' former mistress, paula broadwell, leaving early this morning with several boxes. this, after the fbi told abc news they discovered thousands of e-mails between broadwell and petraeus, detailing the affair. >> in his universe, this moral failing is unacceptable and renders him unworthy of continuing this position of responsibility for the nation. >> reporter: the affair came to light over the summer, as part of an fbi investigation that began after jill kelly received threatening e-mails she believed from broadwell. >> the fbi, that's an investigation. and they realized they had general petraeus caught up in some fashion. and that caused them to take it all the way through to see what they really had. >> reporter: officials say broadwell had classified material on her computer, which is illegal. but the fbi does not believe any of it came from petraeus. no charges have been filed against her. controversy over how the investigation was conducted has engulfed washington. members of congress want to know why the fbi and the attorney general waited until this past wednesday to notify
ABC
Nov 13, 2012 4:00am PST
right up. >>> and a writer who helped paula broadwell on the petraeus biography says he was dumbfounded when news about the affair broke. vernon loeb, said his wife called him the most clueless person in america for not suspect something was going on between broadwell and the general. looking back, he says there were some red flags. >> what was a question in my mind, quite frankly, was why general petraeus was granting paula broadwell the kind of access he granted her. i never fully understood it. but i always sort of rationalized it in my own mind as something he felt he could control. i thought she was getting what other reporters could get. but she was just getting more of it. and getting more access and more kind of close-in access than other reporters got. >> now, loeb says paula wrote him an e-mail on saturday saying, quote, we will get through this. this story continues to develop. watch "good morning america" at 7:00 a.m., for several new reports, including a closer look at the woman at the center of the scandal, paula broadwell, and what could be next for her. >>> and turning o
ABC
Nov 13, 2012 6:30pm EST
friendly relationships with top military brass. the fbi traced those e-mails back to paula broadwell's computer, where they discovered the evidence of broadwell's affair with david petraeus. but it doesn't stop there. abc news has learned that general allen also received an anonymous e-mail traced to paula broadwell, painting jill kelley as a seductress. a further look by the fbi into kelley's e-mails revealed hundreds between kelley and allen, 20,000 to 30,000 pages of communications in all. but a source familiar with the e-mails say they contain no evidence of a sexual relationship, something allen strongly denied. instead, the e-mails are described as friendly, perhaps flirty, but routine, mostly about meetings with ambassadors and dinner parties. in one note kelley tells the general she saw him on tv. he responds, "thanks, dear, you're a sweetheart." many e-mails were from kelley to general allen's wife. the two couples were good friends. >> until someone proves otherwise, i believe that he did nothing inappropriate. >> reporter: today the white house says the president obama still has fait
Comedy Central
Nov 13, 2012 10:00am PST
between him and paula broadwell his biographer were indicative of an extra marital affair. >> jon: how exciting. wait. ( cheers and applause ) the woman involved is petraeus' biographer paula broadwell. why does that name seem so familiar to me? please welcome to the program paula broadwell. no, no, that's not it. oh, wait. that is it. by the way, in case anyone out there thought i may have actual journalist instincts, i give you a quick snippet of my interview. >> he's a very high-energy person. he loves serving. he loves to be in the arena >> i thought i would test him but he would test me. >> crushed his pelvis. it was back in the swimming pool. from a mentoring point of view wanted to help me with this project. he can turn water into bottled water >> jon: the whole thing was innuendo after innuendo. the whole time i'm like duh. i had her right there talking about petraeus and it never crossed my mind. the whole time. i was just staring at how defined her arms were and trying to think of another version of my classic i'm an asthmatic joke. i'm the worst journalist in the world. for
MSNBC
Nov 13, 2012 11:00am PST
multiple law enforcement sources tell nbc was traced back to this woman, paula broadwell. she's admitted to an affair with dvp dp. last night fbi agents searched paula broadwell's home, the home she shares with her family. she had given them permission to go into the home. they took out boxes and apparently photo es. joining me now is jim frederick, editor at "time" magazine. i heard people joke about this and all the salacious titles. but at the heart of this are some serious and legitimate conce concerns. the president not making any huge pronouncements, but starting with general allen here, the e-mails were exchanged over a two-year span. his confirmation is being held up. that's a big deal. >> it's a huge deal. the story is changing by the hour. every hour there are new allegations as pertains to general allen. 20 to 30,000 pages worth of documents. first 30,000 e-mails. you think that's not the case because it would be mathematically impossible. but how much time is he spending as the commander of the war in afghanistan e-mailing this woman. that's one of the central issues to sort
NBC
Nov 12, 2012 11:00pm EST
. former cia director general david petraeus admits his relationship with paula broadwell crossed the line. the question is, did there appear to jeopardize national security? paula broadwell's recent remarks on the bank of the attack amplified the issue. >> they took some libyan members prisoner and they think the attack was an effort to get the prisoners back. >> officials reveal classified documents were found on paula broadwell's computer but both she and petraeus deny he gave her them. >> the probe began when a petraeus family friend told the fbi she was receiving threatening e-mails. the fbi says this e-mail glenn beck to paula broadwell and revealed her a failed -- a pair with petraeus. officials say there is no evidence intelligence was compromise but some politicians want to know why no one outside the agency was notified before election day. >> it is very troubling on the face of it. there are a lot of facts that need to be developed. >> despite the political firestorm brewing, it appears the investigation did follow proper protocol. >> it is not appropriate for the fbi or ju
FOX
Nov 12, 2012 10:00pm EST
calling for answers about the fbi investigation and whether paula broadwell had access to classified information. >> a story only seen on fox 5, nursing home neglect, the serious health and safety violations at a local facility that turned deadly in one case. thanks for joining us tonight. i'm shawn yancy. >> i'm brian bolter. we'll begin with police swarming a maryland college campus this afternoon. >> a student made disturbing threatening remarks at rockville montgomery campus. tonight that student? custody. fox 5's maureen umeh has the story. >> a student was upset over a breakup. he was arrested on the montgomery college campus less than an hour after witnesses reported hearing him make threats. a threat of gun violence on the montgomery college campus in rockville. witnesses said a student commented he felt like shooting people just for fun apparently upset over a recent breakup. >> the witnesses came to the security office and notified them about the statements made. >> reporter: campus security notified rockville police, the two groups swarming the school cinching for the stud
ABC
Nov 13, 2012 7:00am EST
descend overnight on paula broadwell's home. >>> two stranded on mt. rainier. sending distress calls from a snow cave. searchers racing to track them down before it's too late. >>> businessman on the run. we know him as the man who developed the software that protects our computers. now, he's wanted in relation to a murder. >>> and meet this young sensation in this explosive holiday music video. but this is the latest contender for worst song ever? she's getting face, whether you like it or not. >>> good morning, everyone. hello to robin. as you all know, he's recovering from her bone marrow transplant. you need a flow chart to keep track of the sex scandal. it's cost david petraeus his job. and now, overnight, the commanding generalf american forces in afghanistan, general john allen, you see him right there. he's implicated, as well. 20,000 to 30,000 pages of e-mails, to jill kelly. >> the fbi agent you just mentioned has been removed from the case, for sending revealing pictures of himself to that whistleblower. the scandal is growing. and it's resolving around the actions of paul
NBC
Nov 13, 2012 6:30pm EST
affair. he was immediately linked to paula broadwell, like petraeus, she went to west point, an academic who wrote a biography of petraeus. we know about the affair because of jill kelley, she alerted the fbi, said she was getting anonymous harassing e-mails, turns out they were from broadwell. kelley dealt with a lot of generals both in the military and socially in tampa. overnight we learned another four-star general is involved. our current commander in afghanistan, he took over when petraeus left, john allen. now being investigated for what officials describe as potentially inappropriate e-mails with jill kelley of tampa. both of them deny any untoward relationship. they're reviewing the conduct of the first agent who reviewed jill kelley's e-mails in the first place, because he allegedly sent shirtless photos to jill kelley. in plain english, this is a mess. with hearings to come, this can only get larger from here. we begin our reporting of the story tonight with andrea mitchell in the d.c. newsroom. >> tonight the white house is expressing strong support for general john
CNN
Nov 13, 2012 8:00am PST
housewife whom david petraeus' then mistress paula broadwell apparently saw as rival. a whole new chapter in a saga that since last friday has been one bombshell after another. and so far, all of them have something to do with kelley. she's a volunteer military liaison at the air force base, home of the u.s. central command in tampa, florida. kelley complained to the fbi last spring when paula broadwell was having an affair with petraeus allegedly harassed her with jealous e-mails. petraeus admitted the affair with broadwell but denies any elicit contact with kelley. so does general allen who was scheduled for a senate confirmation hearing this very week to become nato's supreme allied commander. today that's on hold, but he will continue in his position as the investigation continues. and all of that as the pentagon digs through 20,000 to 30,000 pages of e-mails and other communications, many with kelley over a two-year period. >>> each revelation brings 100 new questions and my colleague chris lawrence joins me from the pentagon to answer some of them. chris, so many twists and
ABC
Nov 12, 2012 5:30pm PST
between david petraeus and paula broadwell on her computer, an affair that petraeus is claiming did not begin until he left the army. a friend close to petraeus says the general was "shocked and surprised" to learn broadwell had been sending anonymous threatening e-mails to jill kelley, the petraeus family friend who was so alarmed by the e-mails, she called the fbi. those friends also tell us the general's wife, holly petraeus, is furious with her husband. you see her here at his confirmation hearings back in august of 2011, broadwell sitting just a few seats away. petraeus insists they weren't having an affair then, which leads us to the first big question -- when did the affair begin? petraeus' friends claim it started around november 2011, two months after he took over the cia. an important point, since he could be tried under military law for adultery. >> my understanding is that the affair did not begin when he was in the army. >> reporter: but many who know the general suspect it began in afghanistan. it was september 2010 that broadwell made her first of six visits to petraeus i
ABC
Nov 13, 2012 5:00pm EST
at the center of a sex scandal. petraeus resigned after an affair with paula broadwell. >> karen travers reports. >> reporter: the scandal that started with david petraeus' affair has widened. jabble general -- postmaster general john allen is under investigation. 30,000 emails include both allen and kelley's name. another u.s. official said 95% are routine and harmless. allen denies wrong doing. >> the president thinks highly of general allen and the service to his country. >> reporter: as for allen's next move. >> at request of the secretary of defense, the president has put on hold the hearing. >> reporter: the president was surprised. asked whether the scandals with a distraction so soon after the election. >> wouldn't call it welcome. >> reporter: the fbi uncovered hundreds, if not thousands of emails between petraeus and his biographer, paula broadwell, many of them say layious in nature. general allen received an email traced back to broadwell. he told jill kelly about it which may have triggered the investigation. >> new details surrounding that affair comes to light, a l
MSNBC
Nov 13, 2012 1:00am EST
the hour, law enforcement officials have conducted a search of paula broadwell's home in north carolina, which is just step as way from the home of rielle hunter, john edwards' former mistress. i always wait until the last minute. can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. by december 22nd when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. by earning a degree from capella more iuniversity, you'll have the knowledge to make an impact in your company and take your career to an even greater place. let's get started at capella.edu. >>> the first big battle in the republican civil war will
CNN
Nov 13, 2012 1:00pm PST
biographer, paula broadwell. a pentagon official told reporters allen who commands the war in afghanistan is adamant he did nothing wrong. a senior official close to allen tells cnn of kelly there is no affair, she's a bored socialite. a u.s. official says there appears to be nothing criminal involved. but allen is now under investigation for what is called inappropriately flirtatious e-mails to kelly. >> secretary directed it be referred to inspector general of department of defense. >> the fbi found up to 35,000 pages of documents, some dating back two years during the investigation. according to a senior official close to allen, one message the afghan commander sent warned kelly she had been threatened. the official says allen had received an anonymous message, now believed to be from broadwell. the pentagon was called in because allen is subject to military law. but why did this only come out now in public view? >> we have a large amount of alleged material that went between these individuals, as much as 30,000 pages. it's not clear whether this was viewed as a relatively
MSNBC
Nov 13, 2012 1:00pm EST
about paula broadwell's role? late monday night with her consent federal agents served broadwell's home for hours, carting out boxes and bags as they are wrapping up their investigation. >> defense secretary leon panetta on route to australia was the first top administration official to comment on the petraeus departure. >> i think he took the right step, and i think it's important when you're director of the cia with all the challenges that face you, and have -- that personal integrity comes first and foremost. >> panetta a former cia director and the washington shuffle with panetta and clinton saying they want out of the second term. will john kerry now go to the pentagon? can susan rice be confirmed as secretary of state? and will nancy pelosi run for leader again? and what a welcome to washington the new class of congress arriving just in time for a classic d.c. scandal. and a different fall from grace, jon stewart, crowns himself the worst journalist in the world. >> anyone out there who thought i may have actual journalists instincts i give you a snippet of my interview. >> h
MSNBC
Nov 13, 2012 10:00am PST
, of course, led to paula broadwell who led to david petraeus and the relationship that was then uncovered. how did general allen get into this mix? >> your question has the answer in it. basically, jill kelley complained she was getting harassing e-mails. the fbi eventually found who was sending the e-mails, but that caused them to look at both the e-mails that jill kelley was receiving and the ones that paula broadwell was sending. in the midst of looking at the e-mails jill kelley was receiving here are all these messages from general allen. so, you know, they -- the obviously concluded there was no crime in the e-mail exchanges he had with her, but they felt it should be referred to the defense department as a personnel matter, which is the same phrase they used when they told the director of national intelligence, general clapper, about what petraeus was doing. no crime in that what turned out to be an adulterous relationship, but the boss should know. >> the other thing that happened overnight we were watching real time as ten fbi agents arrived in charlotte at the home of
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